Tag Archives: exercise

The connection between “Being Good” and “Being Bad”

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This was a segment on NPR yesterday about a study on why we might tend to “be bad” after “being good” .

When you are an experienced dieter, you know how to “be good”.  You know all the rules and tricks in order to take in less and burn more calories.  You could probably could write a book on it!

It is interesting to learn from research in the field of marketing.  It gives us great clues in to what drives us, what motivates our decisions .   This term used called “licensing” is a handy one. It describes that switch that seems to happen when we have been following the plan closely for a while and then suddenly, without warning, we switch and make a complete 180 degree turn to do the exact opposite of what we know we “should do.

When we are trying at achieve a goal like weight loss, we can get really focused on all the rules.  We follow what someone else tells us we need to do and try really hard to stick with it.   We can become like a child sitting at a fancy restaurant trying really hard to be polite, use good manners and sit still. Eventually, they will lose it (hopefully not in the restaurant!).  Its like trying to hold our breath – there is only so long we can try hard to ignore signals from our body to do what we want and need to do.

Stringent, intense, hard-core exercise programs put us in that position.  We are working so hard to measure up, to perform, to keep up, to ignore pain and fatigue signals from our body.  That it can only last so long.  Eventually we are going to head in the complete opposite direction.

Moderation is key.  It is not glamorous, flashy or newsworthy, but it works when it comes to exercise.  Studies indicate moderate intensity of cardiovascular exercise  is enough to improve stamina.  Moderate amounts of training, like one set three days a week, works to improve strength.

So moderate is enough and pushing hard makes us lose motivation…. hmmmm   maybe we can finally lose the idea that we need to try to be good and not be bad and simply enjoy moving again!

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | July 11, 2017 · 7:00 pm

Resilience!

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Some members of my family just returned from Haiti.  When I saw this picture I was just amazed.  It is impressive enough how people walk for miles and miles balancing heavy objects on their head. This woman is doing it with one leg!!!

Years ago I taught aerobics for people with disabilities.  I will never forget the woman  with a birth defect where the only limb she was born with was a left arm. I can still picture her in her wheelchair doing aerobics like nobody’s business!

Here at the Weight Center there are countless stories of resilience.  The images in the header above are just a few.  These are snapshots of success but in between I know were many days of challenges to overcome in order to get there.  cropped-keep_moving_banner_09-301.jpg

We all have our challenges.  Some days are much harder than others.  This is not meant to be an article to make you feel guilty when you skip exercise.  Just the opposite.  It is a reminder that resiliency only comes from our challenges.

When your life is limited by your body, it is a challenge.  It is those challenges, combined with a sense of purpose, that create resiliency. And resiliency is what it takes to keep moving forward.  We don’t move forward in one straight line.  We will have days the challenges win.  Resiliency does not come over night.  It is a gradual strength that only comes from being committed to doing the best you can at meeting your challenges day by day by day.

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | May 30, 2017 · 8:37 pm

Myth #9: “It will be easier when…”

crocus-292306__480If you ever doubt humans are optimistic, talk to a New Englander in spring!   As the snow melts, so does the weight of winter on our motivation to move.  We feel the hope of longer days and walking outside without fear of slipping on ice.  Its wonderful!!!

Now, I don’t want to be a buzz kill.  I believe in optimism and do not want to squash any of it . However, I know from experience, a bit of realism this time of year can help us stay optimistic all year long.

OK… Brace your self – here comes the reality… Winter will return.  Breathe…. it will be OK!  Lets use this optimistic energy to ready ourselves now for next winter.  As they say “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!”

Chose your favorite way to take notes and  jot down your thoughts:

  • How does my body feels right now at the end of winter? 
  • How do I want it to feel?
  • What was my best experience with exercising during the winter months?
  • What did I learn from that experience I can use now?
  • What are the challenges to exercising in the winter?
  • What do I want to try next winter based upon what I know about my successes and challenges? 

Take your plan and put it where you will see it in October of this year.  Now you can rest easy knowing winter may be a bit easier with a plan in place.

Keep in mind, this optimism also shows up when we are setting out on a weight loss bicycle-788733__480plan.  The idea that “when I lose weight things will be easier”, can cause us to put off dealing with the true challenges to exercising regularly.  Take an honest look here as well.  What challenges will not go away not matter how much you weight?  What can you do to build your confidence in handling them now rather than hoping they will take care of themselves when you are at your goal weight.

Ok, enough realism! Lets get back to that Spring optimism!

Keep Moving, Be Well,
Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | April 4, 2017 · 4:08 pm

Myth #8: The Fitness “Expert”

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When you seek a professional to give you advice or provide a service, whether it is for electrical wiring in your home or getting a haircut, what do you look for? Of course you look to a source you can trust – a professional with the required certification, training, and experience.  It is important to know that the field of fitness has no requirements for professionals. Anyone can call themselves a fitness expert. Our source for advice about how to move and be well is sadly under-regulated and as a result, full of myths and mindsets that are not science-based. This means that right now, you, as a fitness consumer, need to stay educated or your exercise advice may lead you in the opposite direction of the motivation and fitness you are seeking.

Next time you listen to advice about exercise on TV or the internet, notice why they call themselves an “expert.”  Are they highlighting that they  a) have a personal success story,  b) were successful as an athlete, or c) trained someone famous? These are all red flags! Even if they are certified, know that there are no requirements for certification programs and no one is ensuring that person’s certification is up to date. Our professional organizations for degrees and certified exercise professionals are working on this, but it is a very slow process!

Currently, there are two sites that provide helpful information about fitness professionals for consumers. Use these sites to find a qualified professional who holds a certification that is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). This means the certification exam has met set standards for the exercise professional’s role as defined by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The United States Registry of Exercise Professionals maintains a list of professionals with any accredited certification. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) is the “gold standard” for certifying exercise professionals. The ACSM continuously clarifies the various levels of training for exercise professionals,  defining their role and scope of practice clearly. This makes it easier to find a professional who has the right level of training for you, whether you are without health concerns and looking for a qualified personal trainer or have a health concern and need a clinical exercise professional to safely guide you with exercise. Check the ACSM ProFinder to find professionals with this level of certification and training in your area.

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The myth here is that just because someone looks fit they know about how to help you get fit too.   Most important is to trust your instincts.   If the advice you are receiving is not leading to feeling better right away, keep searching for the right professional for you.  Remember, you don’t need to suffer now to feel good later. If exercise is causing increased pain, speak up.  If the professional you are working with tells you the pain is necessary to lose weight,  walk away from it and find a new approach.   My hope is that some day, this will be easier for you as a consumer. Until then, let’s not let the confusion get in the way of exercising consistently and enjoying movement.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | March 28, 2017 · 4:10 pm

Myth #5: Core Strength

crunchIf I had a dime for every crunch I did in my lifetime ,  I would have that dream home in the Caribbean by now!  Doing abdominal exercises in various forms, such as crunches, oblique crunches, sit ups, reverse crunches,  V-sits, and planks are a staple in most routines.  When I was teaching aerobics years ago, if I skipped the abs portion, I would have been run out of the gym by 30 people in leg warmers and “big hair” (OK, it was the 80’s!).  However, this is often still the case (minus the “big hair”).  It is time for this fitness myth to catch up with the science.

The trunk  contains some pretty important parts of the body –  the organs, spinal cord, spine, heart, lungs.  The purpose of the core muscle group is to stabilize and protect this area of the body during movements of daily life.

core-musclesWhen we are “working” the core, we often mean we want to reduce the size of the trunk area – AKA spot reduce fat in the abdomen.  Spot reducing is a myth (period).  Yet,  take a look most popular core programs and you will see the myth of spot reducing  alive and  well! (even if it is just implied).   We need to be very savvy fitness consumers to recognize myth based marketing when we see it.  The reality is “working” the core does not really “slim” the core!

What does it mean to strengthen the core?  We can plank longer, do more crunches or sit ups, lift more weight with our core muscles?  While this would be a measure of core strength, the real question is, does it lead to better function of the core in daily life?  Does a strong core mean these muscles can do their job to hold the spine in alignment and reduce daily wear and tear, minimize the risk of back pain, enable us to do daily tasks with ease?

coreRemember the principle of specificity of exercise?  If we want the core muscles to do their job, we need to learn to consciously activate these muscles with our brain during motions of daily life. Exercises done lying down do not mimic daily life and relies on gravity instead of conscious control from the brain to activate the core muscles.

What we want is core control.  This means you can consciously activate your  core muscles to hold your spine in alignment when lifting a heavy object, reaching overhead, twisting to reach an object, etc.  Here is how:

  • First, learn what alignment is for you.  When the spine is out of alignment, the core muscles are not “lined up” to work their best and this increases wear and tear on the back.
  • Notice when you are pulled out of alignment and practice using the brain to activate core muscles for that movement.
  • During ALL strength training exercises, incorporate core bracing with proper alignment, without holding your breath.
  • Practice turning off these muscles when you don’t need them. (ie: during cardio exercise).   Often we are taught to “hold in the core muscle” when we really do not need them.  Relax those core muscles in between activities so they can recharged for when you do need them

Admittedly, this will require a mindset shift away from the hope of spot reducing the abdomen and the idea that traditional core exercises will improve function in daily life.  The payoff is real “results” from an exercise plan based on the reality of movement science rather than long-standing fitness myths.

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | February 13, 2017 · 3:57 pm

Myth # 3: The Calorie Burning Game

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Have you been playing the calorie burning game?  Paying close attention to how many calories you burn during a work out or on your activity monitor? Letting those numbers tell you how much you can or can’t eat?  Relying on those numbers for your exercise motivation?  Getting frustrated when you don’t lose weight even though you have been burning a ton of calories?

If so, are you missing out?  The true benefit of exercise for weight loss is not the calorie burning!

The fact is that the amount of calories we burn during movement varies greatly.  It is relatively small compared to the amount we could consume in just a fraction of the time.  More importantly though, those number are a big distraction.  I often hear of patients suffering through exercise just to burn calories or so focused on burning calories without realizing how good exercise feels.

Stress is part of life!  There is no way around it. Whether it is a big stressful event or chronic long-lasting stress,  the response in our body is the same.  Stress prepares the body for movement.   When we don’t move in response to stress, it drains our energy, lowers our immune systems ability to keep us healthy, and adds unnecessary wear and tear on every system in the body!

comfort-foods-600x857When we are feeling down or tense from stress, we look for comfort. We naturally want to feel better.  Our brain learns pretty quickly that those easy to access foods with sugar and fat help the brain feel better.  Comfort foods increase brain chemicals that improve our mood, until… we realize we just blew our best intention to eat well.  Then feel crummy again, thus adding to the stress response.  It’s a vicious cycle isn’t it!

Enter the calorie burning game.  We might try to burn off those calories by fervently exercising.  Exercising to make up for a mistake keeps us in that vicious cycle.  We might be tempted to push too hard and feel more tired and sore after.  We are reminded how hard it is to burn off those extra calories and feel even worse.

Ready to end the game?

How do you know you are stressed? What does stress look and feel like in your life?  Tight jaw and stomach? Tension in your shoulders?  Trouble sleeping? Headache? Moody? Food cravings?  Great!  What? Yes, great!  These are your warning signals. It is your body telling you it is ready to move!   The fact is that exercise, even simply movement breaks, increases the same chemicals in our brain as comfort food, just in a natural way!  (minus the viscous cycle of extra calories and guilt).  Replacing eating in response to stress with movement gives the body what it really needs.  THAT is the real value of exercise for weight loss!

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician

Leave a comment

by | January 31, 2017 · 7:15 pm

Myths that Build Barriers. Part One: No Pain No Gain

myth truth.jpgWhen I read the statistic that only 20% of the US population are getting the recommended amount of exercise consistently enough to reap the benefits, I wonder “what is getting in the way?!”  There is certainly no shortage of reasons to exercise, yet there are plenty of barriers too.  Lack of time, pain issues, low motivation are very real barriers.   However, these barriers are built up by myths about exercise, kept alive by infomercials, reality TV shows and “fitness experts” selling their own personal (not science based) success formula.  Movement is a science.  Lets rely on science rather than myths to keep moving and be well.

We will tacno-pain-no-gainkle the biggest myth first: “No Pain No Gain!

I find this one seeps into everything from infomercials to even the more well-regarded articles and podcasts.   The idea that muscles need to be sore to get stronger is offered as a fact, even though there is no scientific basis for it when we are talking about exercising to improve health and well-being.

Part of the confusion is that in sports and military training, pain is just part of the package.  To excel and compete in these activities, the body needs to be pushed  beyond its limits.  Pain will be part of that.  Yet we have discussed how training for athletics and training for well-being are opposites. Since this is where many of us learn about exercise, and sports are a big part of our culture, it makes sense that the myth lives on.  When listening to any information about exercise, be aware of this confusion. The sports training is so often intertwined with discussions about exercise for well-being they can seem like one and the same.  But we know they are not.  Please spread the word!

Reality TV shows certainly do their part to keep this myth alive as well.  They send the motivation sapping message that in order to lose weight you must suffer. If you are not suffering, you must not want it bad enough!  Reality TV shows are NOT reality.  They are not science based. They are concerned about keeping viewers (period).

If you are looking to help you body lose fat and preserve muscle and metabolism, soreness is not needed, nor is it helpful.  Start with a light intensity and over a few weeks gradually work up to challenging your muscles.  Starting with a very challenging workout is like over-watering a small seedling of a plant – it is too much of a good thing and prevents, rather than promotes growth.     Some light soreness is normal with any new activity, but if it happens with each workout, and /or if it is so intense that you do not want to move, it was too much.  It is pain without gain.

Bottom line:  If you are looking to exercise to improve health and well-being,  learning to move without pain is the goal!  Striving to enjoy movement, as a source of boosting mood, energy and vitality is how we truly gain from exercise in the long run.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

Leave a comment

by | January 10, 2017 · 9:19 pm