Tag Archives: exercise motivation

Resilience!

resilience

Some members of my family just returned from Haiti.  When I saw this picture I was just amazed.  It is impressive enough how people walk for miles and miles balancing heavy objects on their head. This woman is doing it with one leg!!!

Years ago I taught aerobics for people with disabilities.  I will never forget the woman  with a birth defect where the only limb she was born with was a left arm. I can still picture her in her wheelchair doing aerobics like nobody’s business!

Here at the Weight Center there are countless stories of resilience.  The images in the header above are just a few.  These are snapshots of success but in between I know were many days of challenges to overcome in order to get there.  cropped-keep_moving_banner_09-301.jpg

We all have our challenges.  Some days are much harder than others.  This is not meant to be an article to make you feel guilty when you skip exercise.  Just the opposite.  It is a reminder that resiliency only comes from our challenges.

When your life is limited by your body, it is a challenge.  It is those challenges, combined with a sense of purpose, that create resiliency. And resiliency is what it takes to keep moving forward.  We don’t move forward in one straight line.  We will have days the challenges win.  Resiliency does not come over night.  It is a gradual strength that only comes from being committed to doing the best you can at meeting your challenges day by day by day.

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | May 30, 2017 · 8:37 pm

“All in!” Patient Perspective

jump-1209647__480Being “all in”  separates the goals we set because we “should…” from the goals we set because we “REALLY want…!”

Lets face it, trying to do something because we should is exhausting.  Working for something we REALLY want is energizing.  Below is one patients story of what happens when you go “all in”.  Although this is a patient who decided to have weight loss surgery, the approach can be applied to any goal set because we want to enjoy life to the fullest.

First, let me start by saying that when I went to the original orientation meeting for the Weight Center, I had absolutely no intention of having surgery. I was thinking that I could lose weight with behavior modification. Heck, I’d done it before. Of course, the weight always came back, usually those pounds brought a few friends with them. To consolidate this, I did have a sleeve mastectomy in 2014. At first, I reluctantly pursued an exercise regimen, because I was *told* that this was part of the program, not because I actually wanted to. My mindset at that time was simply this, I had gone through all the preparation and such to have the procedure done, I may as well do the work – this might be my last opportunity to be healthy (note, I did NOT say “skinny”).

I’m by no means saying that I’m perfect, or that anyone should see me as an example of what you *should* do. But I found, over time, that success becomes its best motivation. For every thing I suddenly realized I could do that I could never do before, I wanted to do more. Success is insidious and addictive. People who haven’t “been there” have no idea how empowering it can become to be able to MOVE, to do things that darn near felt like a near death experience before. Over the course of the last 2 1/2 years since my surgery, I’ve gone from being a card-carrying couch potato to working out nearly every day for an average of 45-60 minutes. I bought into the mindset that long term success requires total lifestyle change. It’s not a finite endeavor with some “end goal”, after which you can go back to your old habits. They’re what got you to the point of seeking surgery.

I’ve heard others say things like “I don’t want to deprive myself”, or “I don’t exercise, but I’m still losing weight”, and in inwardly cringe. These people just don’t seem to understand that bariatric surgery isn’t some magic pill that is going to fix what’s wrong…. it is merely a tool that can be used to aid in major changes in behavior. In order to be successful long term, you really DO have to go “all in” and exercise as well. No matter if your stomach is the size of a hard boiled egg or a Winnebago, exercise will *always* be a part of achieving a healthy body.

I went “all in”, and I still have work to do to reach my goal weight, but that is really secondary to what is truly important – being healthy. My advice, for what it’s worth is this: embrace the whole shebang, you might curse the process in the beginning, but when you see and feel your own success, you’ll be eternally grateful you did it.

diving-2167584__480

Keep Moving, Be Well, Be All In!

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | April 10, 2017 · 3:18 pm

Fitness part 4: The power of enjoying the scenery

enjoy exercie 2Enjoyment of exercise is often dismissed as a n0n-essential part of fitness. It can seem frivolous, even counterproductive.  If I am enjoying it, it must not be hard enough to be worth it. Yet, research shows this factor can make all the difference in gaining long term benefits.

Why is enjoyment an essential part of fitness for health and well-being?

  1. We are motivated by pleasure and reward.  This is just the way our brains are set up to help us survive and thrive.  When exercise is something to “get through” or “just do”, motivation is not as sustainable.  Working with our natural motivation toward things that are rewarding and pleasurable is much more effective than gritting our teeth just to get through a workout.
  2. Success breeds success:  Accomplishment counteracts laziness! Have you ever noticed that energizing feeling of finishing a project.  After exercise we often move on to the next thing without thinking, missing out on the chance to boost our motivation for next time we are stuck.    Or worse, we are left feeling like it just was not good enough, we should have done more.  Pause and savor how you feel after exercise, even if it is just that sense of accomplishment of doing something (always better than nothing).   Taking a moment to celebrate the small victories has big payoffs for sticking with your plan long term.
  3. The Belief Effect:  Research has shown that the placebo effect is so real it is now called “The Belief Effect” . What we believe about a medical treatment actually changes how the body responds to it.  Well now we have that evidence of the belief effect for exercise too.  Check out this study about how what we expect from exercise changes the benefits in the mind and the body.  What you are thinking when you are exercising can change what you get from it.  If you are exercising so you can gain the great benefits of fitness, it is worth taking the time to create a plan and a mindset for enjoyment!

 

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | August 17, 2016 · 6:09 pm

Fitness Part 3: Choose a destination

many pathsWhen it comes to fitness, there are so many paths to take.  Not all lead to the same destination.  It depends on what you want from fitness. 

Remember the definition….

Physical Fitness= 

The ability to do activities of daily life with ease

and have energy left over for recreation and to meet emergencies.

Choose your destination:  Get clear about what you want from weight loss and exercise, then train for what you want.  If you goal is to do burpies better, then do burpies.  If not, skip the burpies!!!  If your goal is to have the stamina to travel and walk around amazing places with friends and family without fatigue – then walk often at the level your body can do now and gradually build up your tolerance of walking.  Even if you start with 15 seconds several times a day, you are training for YOUR goal.   These are the questions to ask yourself to know where you want to go:

  • What daily activities do I need to do?
  • What do I want to be able to do for fun?
  • What is important for me to be able to do to meet emergencies? (ie: get up off the floor if I fall, be able to climb the stairs)

You are here:  Where are you now?  Again, another important questions if you are going to get the destination you want.  What are you able to do? What gets in the way?  Awareness is key.  Taking a day or two to ponder these questions can make getting to your destination much easier.   Jot down some thoughts before moving forward with your exercise plan.

Stay on course:  How do you know if you are on course?  Expert advice is helpful.   However, what your body is telling you is  more reliable and accurate than any outside measure (like how much weight lifted, how many miles you moved, or the latest fitness trend).  Here are some ways to help you from getting caught in a detour:

  • Physical or mental fatigue:  Learn to tell the difference between feeling tired because you were physically active all day and feeling tired because you were more mentally active.  Mental and physical fatigue can feel the similar. When it is mental fatigue, give your body what it needs by moving in some way.  If you get energy from moment, it was definitely mental fatigue.
  • Tired or lazy?   A better term for lazy is just not motivated.  This is very different than being physically tired.  They can feel the same unless we really take a closer look.  If you are feeling lazy, check to see if your goal is too big and overwhelm is draining motivation. Lower the goal and see if that cures laziness.  Check to see if you have just lost sight of your destination,  the whole reason you want to get moving in the first place.  Remind yourself of your destination and see if that gives you some energy.
  • How do I feel after exercise? If you walk away from exercise feeling worse about yourself or physically exhausted, it was too much!  The right exercise for you right now is the one that makes you feel better physically and mentally. Choose what makes you feel better, and you found what is right for you.  Do that exercise as often as you want to feel better!

More next week….

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | August 1, 2016 · 5:43 pm

One Thing I have Never Heard a Patient Say…

walking long road

After listening to patients experiences with weight loss over the years, I can say one thing I have never heard:  “I re-gained weight, but have not changed my exercise and physical activity level”.  Never, not one patient that I can recall has reported this scenario.

Why?

Because the two tend to go hand in hand.  Lower activity level, increase weight.  I am pretty sure you know this first hand.

Now, exercise is not the magic bullet for weight loss.  Food habits have to be a main focus for weight loss success.   However, physical activity and exercise add a huge boost that is hard to beat:

1)” Wiggle room” in your food intake for the occasional slips and celebrations.

2) Maintaining metabolism, which lowers as one loses weight without doing strength training.

Certainly, a consistent activity level is not a 100%  guarantee that  you will maintain weight loss – but it is a pretty good bet.

Life, however, is not consistent.  How do we keep life from getting in the way?

  • Keep your exercise program sustainable: The quick-fix exercise programs may have great results, but if you cannot sustain it, the results will quickly fade. When setting up an exercise program ask yourself, Is this sustainable?
  • Plan A, Plan B…:  Have at least one back up plan if your scheduled exercise time is interrupted.  Schedule Plan A into your calendar.  If there is a conflict – don’t delete – reschedule to Plan B.   For example, you plan on exercising in the morning for 30 minutes, but hit the snooze one too many times.  Reschedule it to two 15 minute  bouts, one at lunchtime and one in the evening.
  • Use lifestyle activity to fill in the gaps:  Lifestyle activity is simply the amount of movement you do during your daily life.   Its about taking advantage of those moments when you can take a quick walk, dance for one song, sneak in some exercises.  It has been shown to work well for weight loss.  Tracking with an activity monitor is helpful here when your regular activity level is lowered for some reason,  such as a longer work meeting or caring for an ill relative.  Armed with the information from your activity monitor,  you can ensure you are burning about the same amount of calories by keeping your step level the same as when you are regularly exercising.
  • Use movement to manage stress:  With plenty of life stressors to go around, if exercise is your go-to remedy, you will have many reasons to keep moving.  In your body, movement is the antidote for the response to stress – so this strategy is a way to naturally work with your body to lower stress level.
  • Connect with your “why”:  Why do you want to lose weight? Keep physical activity connected to your real, bottom line reason, instead of just exercising to make the numbers on the scale go down.  Your “why” is your natural motivation.  When physical activity is connected to your own personal “why”, your natural motivation will remain.

So, while it is great to challenge yourself with fitness goals – one of the best ways to boost your odds for lifelong weight loss success is consistency with exercise.  Hows that for a challenge?

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | June 16, 2016 · 3:29 pm

Need Another Reason To Strength Train?

dumbbellsThere are many, many reasons to add a regular strength training routine to your weekly schedule.  We know that strength training plays an ESSENTIAL role in preserving muscle, strength, bone, balance and metabolism with weight loss.

Need another reason to make it a priority?

A recent study published in the medical journal Preventative Medicine found that among the 30,000 U.S adults  in the National Health Interview Survey (HNIS), which looked at health and disease trends in people 65 and older, only about 9 percent were doing strength training the recommended twice a week.  However, when they looked at  that group a bit closer they found some impressive results.  These men and women had 46 percent lower odds of death for any reason than those who did not do strength training!

Even after they accounted for other healthy behaviors and medical conditions to be sure the results were just from the strength training.  PLUS, this is after they adjusted for their physical activity level overall. So the protection was not just because they were active or doing other healthy behaviors, it was something unique about the strength training that provided the protection.

Hopefully this will help put the myths to rest that strength training is just for body builders, or that muscle is bad because it weights more than fat, or that it causes big bulky muscles.  Hopefully next time they do this study they will find more than 9% of the folks are doing strength training!
The great news is that it does not take much time. Twice a week, even one set does it.  That will take maybe 15-30 minutes each session.   Its quite a bargain!
Keep Moving (Strength Training), Be Well,
Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | May 11, 2016 · 6:54 pm

ENJOY the Holidays!

thCASYRORCIt’s the holiday season.

You might be expecting me to say how important it is to stay on your exercise routine.

Take a walk with family members instead of sitting around the table.

Exercise helps with stress.

Yada yada yada.

You know it –  I don’t need to say it.

So this is just a simple reminder to ENJOY the season –

in all its craziness, temptations, mixed emotions and stress.

As much as possible, take care of yourself.

Not because you are trying to lose or maintain weight

and you are “supposed to”

but because you know that when you take care of yourself

you  feel good,

 and when you feel good

you can really enjoy the season.

My wish for you  is that you take the very best possible care of yourself, that you feel great, and enjoy this season.

Happy Holidays!

Keep Moving, Be Well – and Enjoy!

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery. 

Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

 

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