May Post-Bariatric Surgery Support Group

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by | April 20, 2017 · 7:38 pm

“All in!” Patient Perspective

jump-1209647__480Being “all in”  separates the goals we set because we “should…” from the goals we set because we “REALLY want…!”

Lets face it, trying to do something because we should is exhausting.  Working for something we REALLY want is energizing.  Below is one patients story of what happens when you go “all in”.  Although this is a patient who decided to have weight loss surgery, the approach can be applied to any goal set because we want to enjoy life to the fullest.

First, let me start by saying that when I went to the original orientation meeting for the Weight Center, I had absolutely no intention of having surgery. I was thinking that I could lose weight with behavior modification. Heck, I’d done it before. Of course, the weight always came back, usually those pounds brought a few friends with them. To consolidate this, I did have a sleeve mastectomy in 2014. At first, I reluctantly pursued an exercise regimen, because I was *told* that this was part of the program, not because I actually wanted to. My mindset at that time was simply this, I had gone through all the preparation and such to have the procedure done, I may as well do the work – this might be my last opportunity to be healthy (note, I did NOT say “skinny”).

I’m by no means saying that I’m perfect, or that anyone should see me as an example of what you *should* do. But I found, over time, that success becomes its best motivation. For every thing I suddenly realized I could do that I could never do before, I wanted to do more. Success is insidious and addictive. People who haven’t “been there” have no idea how empowering it can become to be able to MOVE, to do things that darn near felt like a near death experience before. Over the course of the last 2 1/2 years since my surgery, I’ve gone from being a card-carrying couch potato to working out nearly every day for an average of 45-60 minutes. I bought into the mindset that long term success requires total lifestyle change. It’s not a finite endeavor with some “end goal”, after which you can go back to your old habits. They’re what got you to the point of seeking surgery.

I’ve heard others say things like “I don’t want to deprive myself”, or “I don’t exercise, but I’m still losing weight”, and in inwardly cringe. These people just don’t seem to understand that bariatric surgery isn’t some magic pill that is going to fix what’s wrong…. it is merely a tool that can be used to aid in major changes in behavior. In order to be successful long term, you really DO have to go “all in” and exercise as well. No matter if your stomach is the size of a hard boiled egg or a Winnebago, exercise will *always* be a part of achieving a healthy body.

I went “all in”, and I still have work to do to reach my goal weight, but that is really secondary to what is truly important – being healthy. My advice, for what it’s worth is this: embrace the whole shebang, you might curse the process in the beginning, but when you see and feel your own success, you’ll be eternally grateful you did it.

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Keep Moving, Be Well, Be All In!

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | April 10, 2017 · 3:18 pm

Myth #9: “It will be easier when…”

crocus-292306__480If you ever doubt humans are optimistic, talk to a New Englander in spring!   As the snow melts, so does the weight of winter on our motivation to move.  We feel the hope of longer days and walking outside without fear of slipping on ice.  Its wonderful!!!

Now, I don’t want to be a buzz kill.  I believe in optimism and do not want to squash any of it . However, I know from experience, a bit of realism this time of year can help us stay optimistic all year long.

OK… Brace your self – here comes the reality… Winter will return.  Breathe…. it will be OK!  Lets use this optimistic energy to ready ourselves now for next winter.  As they say “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!”

Chose your favorite way to take notes and  jot down your thoughts:

  • How does my body feels right now at the end of winter? 
  • How do I want it to feel?
  • What was my best experience with exercising during the winter months?
  • What did I learn from that experience I can use now?
  • What are the challenges to exercising in the winter?
  • What do I want to try next winter based upon what I know about my successes and challenges? 

Take your plan and put it where you will see it in October of this year.  Now you can rest easy knowing winter may be a bit easier with a plan in place.

Keep in mind, this optimism also shows up when we are setting out on a weight loss bicycle-788733__480plan.  The idea that “when I lose weight things will be easier”, can cause us to put off dealing with the true challenges to exercising regularly.  Take an honest look here as well.  What challenges will not go away not matter how much you weight?  What can you do to build your confidence in handling them now rather than hoping they will take care of themselves when you are at your goal weight.

Ok, enough realism! Lets get back to that Spring optimism!

Keep Moving, Be Well,
Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | April 4, 2017 · 4:08 pm

Myth #8: The Fitness “Expert”

Fitness expert

When you seek a professional to give you advice or provide a service, whether it is for electrical wiring in your home or getting a haircut, what do you look for? Of course you look to a source you can trust – a professional with the required certification, training, and experience.  It is important to know that the field of fitness has no requirements for professionals. Anyone can call themselves a fitness expert. Our source for advice about how to move and be well is sadly under-regulated and as a result, full of myths and mindsets that are not science-based. This means that right now, you, as a fitness consumer, need to stay educated or your exercise advice may lead you in the opposite direction of the motivation and fitness you are seeking.

Next time you listen to advice about exercise on TV or the internet, notice why they call themselves an “expert.”  Are they highlighting that they  a) have a personal success story,  b) were successful as an athlete, or c) trained someone famous? These are all red flags! Even if they are certified, know that there are no requirements for certification programs and no one is ensuring that person’s certification is up to date. Our professional organizations for degrees and certified exercise professionals are working on this, but it is a very slow process!

Currently, there are two sites that provide helpful information about fitness professionals for consumers. Use these sites to find a qualified professional who holds a certification that is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). This means the certification exam has met set standards for the exercise professional’s role as defined by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The United States Registry of Exercise Professionals maintains a list of professionals with any accredited certification. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) is the “gold standard” for certifying exercise professionals. The ACSM continuously clarifies the various levels of training for exercise professionals,  defining their role and scope of practice clearly. This makes it easier to find a professional who has the right level of training for you, whether you are without health concerns and looking for a qualified personal trainer or have a health concern and need a clinical exercise professional to safely guide you with exercise. Check the ACSM ProFinder to find professionals with this level of certification and training in your area.

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The myth here is that just because someone looks fit they know about how to help you get fit too.   Most important is to trust your instincts.   If the advice you are receiving is not leading to feeling better right away, keep searching for the right professional for you.  Remember, you don’t need to suffer now to feel good later. If exercise is causing increased pain, speak up.  If the professional you are working with tells you the pain is necessary to lose weight,  walk away from it and find a new approach.   My hope is that some day, this will be easier for you as a consumer. Until then, let’s not let the confusion get in the way of exercising consistently and enjoying movement.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | March 28, 2017 · 4:10 pm

Myth #7: Sweat

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Two years ago I wrote a blog Know Sweat about the myth that one needs to sweat to “get a good workout”.  Today I was reading a research article and the subjects were instructed to exercise “to a point that worked up a sweat”(sigh!).    Because I still hear many people using sweat as a measure of the quality of their exercise, its time to re-visit this myth.

Facts:

  • Sweat does not mean you are burning extra calories or melting away fat!
  • The body needs water to function well.
    • over-sweating limits the body’s ability to function
  • Sweating depends on:
    • how you are dressed
    • the temperature of the air
    • amount of air movement (outside on a windy day vs. in a room with no fans)
    • the humidity (sweat does not evaporate as well so you feel the sweat more)
    • your genetics
    • your hydration level
    •  certain medications can make you sweat, like SSRIs (antidepressants).

Sweating is not a reliable way to monitor your exercise intensity nor the quality of a workout.

If you are someone who tends to sweat a lot, be sure to stay hydrated so your body can function well.

If you do not sweat much, don’t sweat it!

Check out the blog on sweating and the blog on cardiovascular exercise for more information about staying hydrated and the reliable ways to tell if you are really getting a “good” workout.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | March 22, 2017 · 6:42 pm

Post-Bariatric Surgery Support Group

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by | March 21, 2017 · 6:33 pm

Myth #6: Myths of Strength Training

Weight loss can be up to 30% muscle loss!  Muscle makes up a big portion of our metabolism level so metabolism can take a big drop when we lose weight.    Strength training counteracts this metabolism lowering effect of weight loss.  However, there are several myths that get in the way of making strength training part of a weight loss plan.   Here are the reasons I hear most often:

I don’t need to do strength training, I get enough in everyday life:  Moving in daily life is thCAY06ENZimportant for health but is probably not enough to counteract the muscle loss with dieting.  Muscles are made up of many muscle fibers.  The muscle fibers we use, add to our metabolism. The ones we don’t use, go into a hibernation and don’t add much to metabolism.   Most daily movements don’t fatigue muscles fully, leaving some muscle fibers still “asleep”.  Strength training helps wake up muscle fibers and keeps them awake, burning more calories for the next 24-48 hours!

I don’t have time  for strength training:   Doing just one set of basic strength training exercises, working the muscles to fatigue, 2-3 times a week has been shown to be effective.  When you remove all the myth based exercises that just waste time, it really takes about 2-3 sessions a week of about 15-30 minutes.

dumbbell-940375__480I don’t have equipment/gym membership: Dumbbells are one of the best investments in fitness equipment.  They last a long time and they are all you need for a complete strength training program.   Check out yard sales and thrift shops for low cost options.  Want a free option? Soup cans or detergent bottles filled with water are great substitutes! 

I have back pain:    Strength training, done in a way that teaches the core muscles to protect the back during movements of daily life, can decrease back pain.  The key is starting light, listening to your body and paying close attention to using proper form before increasing the amount you are lifting.

I just want to work ____ part of my body:  When we work on “target areas” we are doing a program based on the myth of that we can burn more fat in certain areas of the body by exercising that part. (AKA “spot reducing).   Avoid wasting time on this myth based approach to exercise.  Instead focus on using all of your muscles so metabolism increases and helps your body burn fat all over.

I am concerned I will get hurt:  One surefire way to get injured with exercise is to do too much, too soon.  Listen to your body.  Be smart when adding a new exercise or increasing the resistance.  Exercise is very safe when we work with our body, rather than trying to push the limits to fast.

I want to lose weight first and then build muscle:  It is much easier to maintain muscle than regain it after it is lost.  Plus, losing muscle means lower metabolism putting weight loss success at risk.

I don’t want to bulk up: It is nearly impossible to build a lot of build muscle while losing weight.  It also takes more time and energy than most of us have to devote to exercise in order to “bulk up”.  If you have the genetics to tend to “bulk up” with strength training, keep the sets and repetitions moderate (1-2 sets of 8-12 repetitions) still working to muscle fatigue.

I don’t want to gain weight:  Muscle tissues is more dense than fat, so the myth that is scale-1987770__480weighs more has some truth.  BUT it burns more calories.   Studies show in a good quality three month strength training program participants gained only about three pounds of muscle, but that did not show up on the scale because they lost fat at the same time.

I don’t want to be in more pain:  It is a myth that muscle soreness is needed to build muscle strength. Strength training should not leave you in pain.   If you have arthritis pain, use a slow gradual progression but don’t avoid strength training.  It has been shown to reduce arthritis pain.

Keep Strength Training and Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

 

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by | March 15, 2017 · 5:14 pm