Category Archives: Weight Loss

Avoiding a Detour

I just finished the book Presence by Amy Cuddy. If you have not seen her TED talk, I highly recommend it.  Dr. Cuddy is a researcher who studies how our body language shapes our behavior. The  book is filled with amazing evidence from her research* and a whole slew of others, about how our body position changes how we think and behave.

detour-44160__480Sustainable weight loss is about keeping ourselves on course when detours pop up.    You come to the end of a VERY long day and you planned on walking, but it is cold and rainy and all you want to do is go home and veg out on the couch.  You are in the midst of a week of chaos in your life and you can’t even think of getting to the gym for  strength training. You get on the scale and feel completely defeated because, despite your best efforts, it is two pounds up!

What if we could get derailed less and back on track easier? What if it was something with research behind it that was simple, free, and completely accessible to you in any moment?  Would you try it?  Even if it seemed a bit strange and unlikely to make a difference?

It turns out that when our body is in a position with shoulders and back rounded we feel less confident.  We are less likely to make choices that are in line with what is most important to us.

low power pose 2

But, when we stand with shoulders and chest open, we are more confident, more likely to stick with what is most important to us.

high power pose

 

It is interesting that across many different cultures and situations, the most common expression of success is raising arms up in a “V”.   We now have some evidence this may work in reverse too!

athlete win 2

Give it a try!  Next time you step in the scale, put your hands on your hips and stand like your favorite superhero!  In the middle of a stressful day, stand or sit in alignment with your body strong.  When you are tempted to skip exercise, stand or sit with your arms up in a “victory” position for two minutes.

Post what happens in the comments section below!

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

*You may have heard some news flashes years ago debunking Dr. Cuddy’s research.  If you read her book, you will see that her study on power poses are just one in many showing there is something powerful in the way we hold our body.  Research is tricky business and one study does not prove anything.  Your best evidence is to try this for yourself and see how it works for you. 

 

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | May 15, 2017 · 5:38 pm

The All-in-One Gauge

gasImagine if the gas gauge on a car measured everything – gas, oil, windshield wiper fluid, water?   Just one gauge for everything together.  How helpful would that gauge be for you?  How would you know what it needed when the gauge was on low?

The scale measures everything – fat, muscle, water, food, clothing – all together in one gauge.   Why then, do we put so much emotion into what it says?

Scale goes down – elation!  Scale goes up – frustration!

Even if it was up because you were on Prednisone that week, or your legs were swollen – that higher number can be so frustrating.  And if it goes down quickly – even if you know that 30% of what was lost was muscle because you were not doing strength training, elation still happens!

Yes, we weigh you here at the Weight Center and look for that number to go down. It is our best objective tool to know that what you are doing is helping.  But it is by no means a perfect tool.    It’s an “all in one” gauge!  That would not be helpful on your car, and it is certainly not helpful if that’s all we use to measure success with healthy lifestyle changes.

So we use other gauges.  How do you feel?  Do you have more energy?  How are you doing with emotional eating? Are you able to do more now than you could before?  Are your clothes fitting better?   Are you doing strength training?  These are the other measures we use as a guide because the scale is an “all in one” guage.

Next time you step on the scale, keep in mind it is an all-in-one measurement.  Use your other measures to really guide you with how your lifestyle changes are working.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | April 26, 2017 · 6:56 pm

“All in!” Patient Perspective

jump-1209647__480Being “all in”  separates the goals we set because we “should…” from the goals we set because we “REALLY want…!”

Lets face it, trying to do something because we should is exhausting.  Working for something we REALLY want is energizing.  Below is one patients story of what happens when you go “all in”.  Although this is a patient who decided to have weight loss surgery, the approach can be applied to any goal set because we want to enjoy life to the fullest.

First, let me start by saying that when I went to the original orientation meeting for the Weight Center, I had absolutely no intention of having surgery. I was thinking that I could lose weight with behavior modification. Heck, I’d done it before. Of course, the weight always came back, usually those pounds brought a few friends with them. To consolidate this, I did have a sleeve mastectomy in 2014. At first, I reluctantly pursued an exercise regimen, because I was *told* that this was part of the program, not because I actually wanted to. My mindset at that time was simply this, I had gone through all the preparation and such to have the procedure done, I may as well do the work – this might be my last opportunity to be healthy (note, I did NOT say “skinny”).

I’m by no means saying that I’m perfect, or that anyone should see me as an example of what you *should* do. But I found, over time, that success becomes its best motivation. For every thing I suddenly realized I could do that I could never do before, I wanted to do more. Success is insidious and addictive. People who haven’t “been there” have no idea how empowering it can become to be able to MOVE, to do things that darn near felt like a near death experience before. Over the course of the last 2 1/2 years since my surgery, I’ve gone from being a card-carrying couch potato to working out nearly every day for an average of 45-60 minutes. I bought into the mindset that long term success requires total lifestyle change. It’s not a finite endeavor with some “end goal”, after which you can go back to your old habits. They’re what got you to the point of seeking surgery.

I’ve heard others say things like “I don’t want to deprive myself”, or “I don’t exercise, but I’m still losing weight”, and in inwardly cringe. These people just don’t seem to understand that bariatric surgery isn’t some magic pill that is going to fix what’s wrong…. it is merely a tool that can be used to aid in major changes in behavior. In order to be successful long term, you really DO have to go “all in” and exercise as well. No matter if your stomach is the size of a hard boiled egg or a Winnebago, exercise will *always* be a part of achieving a healthy body.

I went “all in”, and I still have work to do to reach my goal weight, but that is really secondary to what is truly important – being healthy. My advice, for what it’s worth is this: embrace the whole shebang, you might curse the process in the beginning, but when you see and feel your own success, you’ll be eternally grateful you did it.

diving-2167584__480

Keep Moving, Be Well, Be All In!

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

Leave a comment

by | April 10, 2017 · 3:18 pm

Myth #6: Myths of Strength Training

Weight loss can be up to 30% muscle loss!  Muscle makes up a big portion of our metabolism level so metabolism can take a big drop when we lose weight.    Strength training counteracts this metabolism lowering effect of weight loss.  However, there are several myths that get in the way of making strength training part of a weight loss plan.   Here are the reasons I hear most often:

I don’t need to do strength training, I get enough in everyday life:  Moving in daily life is thCAY06ENZimportant for health but is probably not enough to counteract the muscle loss with dieting.  Muscles are made up of many muscle fibers.  The muscle fibers we use, add to our metabolism. The ones we don’t use, go into a hibernation and don’t add much to metabolism.   Most daily movements don’t fatigue muscles fully, leaving some muscle fibers still “asleep”.  Strength training helps wake up muscle fibers and keeps them awake, burning more calories for the next 24-48 hours!

I don’t have time  for strength training:   Doing just one set of basic strength training exercises, working the muscles to fatigue, 2-3 times a week has been shown to be effective.  When you remove all the myth based exercises that just waste time, it really takes about 2-3 sessions a week of about 15-30 minutes.

dumbbell-940375__480I don’t have equipment/gym membership: Dumbbells are one of the best investments in fitness equipment.  They last a long time and they are all you need for a complete strength training program.   Check out yard sales and thrift shops for low cost options.  Want a free option? Soup cans or detergent bottles filled with water are great substitutes! 

I have back pain:    Strength training, done in a way that teaches the core muscles to protect the back during movements of daily life, can decrease back pain.  The key is starting light, listening to your body and paying close attention to using proper form before increasing the amount you are lifting.

I just want to work ____ part of my body:  When we work on “target areas” we are doing a program based on the myth of that we can burn more fat in certain areas of the body by exercising that part. (AKA “spot reducing).   Avoid wasting time on this myth based approach to exercise.  Instead focus on using all of your muscles so metabolism increases and helps your body burn fat all over.

I am concerned I will get hurt:  One surefire way to get injured with exercise is to do too much, too soon.  Listen to your body.  Be smart when adding a new exercise or increasing the resistance.  Exercise is very safe when we work with our body, rather than trying to push the limits to fast.

I want to lose weight first and then build muscle:  It is much easier to maintain muscle than regain it after it is lost.  Plus, losing muscle means lower metabolism putting weight loss success at risk.

I don’t want to bulk up: It is nearly impossible to build a lot of build muscle while losing weight.  It also takes more time and energy than most of us have to devote to exercise in order to “bulk up”.  If you have the genetics to tend to “bulk up” with strength training, keep the sets and repetitions moderate (1-2 sets of 8-12 repetitions) still working to muscle fatigue.

I don’t want to gain weight:  Muscle tissues is more dense than fat, so the myth that is scale-1987770__480weighs more has some truth.  BUT it burns more calories.   Studies show in a good quality three month strength training program participants gained only about three pounds of muscle, but that did not show up on the scale because they lost fat at the same time.

I don’t want to be in more pain:  It is a myth that muscle soreness is needed to build muscle strength. Strength training should not leave you in pain.   If you have arthritis pain, use a slow gradual progression but don’t avoid strength training.  It has been shown to reduce arthritis pain.

Keep Strength Training and Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

 

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by | March 15, 2017 · 5:14 pm

Myth # 3: The Calorie Burning Game

calories burned.jpg

Have you been playing the calorie burning game?  Paying close attention to how many calories you burn during a work out or on your activity monitor? Letting those numbers tell you how much you can or can’t eat?  Relying on those numbers for your exercise motivation?  Getting frustrated when you don’t lose weight even though you have been burning a ton of calories?

If so, are you missing out?  The true benefit of exercise for weight loss is not the calorie burning!

The fact is that the amount of calories we burn during movement varies greatly.  It is relatively small compared to the amount we could consume in just a fraction of the time.  More importantly though, those number are a big distraction.  I often hear of patients suffering through exercise just to burn calories or so focused on burning calories without realizing how good exercise feels.

Stress is part of life!  There is no way around it. Whether it is a big stressful event or chronic long-lasting stress,  the response in our body is the same.  Stress prepares the body for movement.   When we don’t move in response to stress, it drains our energy, lowers our immune systems ability to keep us healthy, and adds unnecessary wear and tear on every system in the body!

comfort-foods-600x857When we are feeling down or tense from stress, we look for comfort. We naturally want to feel better.  Our brain learns pretty quickly that those easy to access foods with sugar and fat help the brain feel better.  Comfort foods increase brain chemicals that improve our mood, until… we realize we just blew our best intention to eat well.  Then feel crummy again, thus adding to the stress response.  It’s a vicious cycle isn’t it!

Enter the calorie burning game.  We might try to burn off those calories by fervently exercising.  Exercising to make up for a mistake keeps us in that vicious cycle.  We might be tempted to push too hard and feel more tired and sore after.  We are reminded how hard it is to burn off those extra calories and feel even worse.

Ready to end the game?

How do you know you are stressed? What does stress look and feel like in your life?  Tight jaw and stomach? Tension in your shoulders?  Trouble sleeping? Headache? Moody? Food cravings?  Great!  What? Yes, great!  These are your warning signals. It is your body telling you it is ready to move!   The fact is that exercise, even simply movement breaks, increases the same chemicals in our brain as comfort food, just in a natural way!  (minus the viscous cycle of extra calories and guilt).  Replacing eating in response to stress with movement gives the body what it really needs.  THAT is the real value of exercise for weight loss!

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician

Leave a comment

by | January 31, 2017 · 7:15 pm

Myth # 2: Scientific Discoveries

running“Scientists have discovered the best exercise to help people get healthy and lose weight”. As you can imagine, this article caught my eye this morning.  The myth that research can “discover the best” of anything, much less exercise,  keeps these headlines alive in the media.  Subliminally we can be bombarded with broad sweeping statements and recommendations about exercise for weight loss and health.  The simple act of skimming the news or social media can leave us more confused than motivated.

Because you are a savvy fitness consumer however, I know you read between the headlines.  This study is actually very interesting, but far from a discovery of the best exercise to lose weight and get healthy!

The study was published in the Journal Physiological Reports in December 2016. The actual title was:   The impact of exercise intensity on whole body and adipose tissue metabolism during energy restriction in sedentary overweight men and postmenopausal women.  Not quite as catchy, huh?!

Here is the info:

  •  The study involved 38 men and women, average age of 52 years old.  It is nice that it was not on college students and it was a mix of men and women.  Keep in mind, 38 people in one three-week study do not discover anything.  The data simply adds to our understanding.
  • Two groups, one exercised at 50% and one at 70% measured maximal exercise capacity.  Both groups exercised on a treadmill five times a week for three weeks, for the amount of time it took them to burn 400 calories at that exercise level (burning a total of 2000 extra calories a week).  Both groups reduced their calorie intake by 5000 calories a week.
  • Each group lost about the same amount of weight (no statistical difference).
  • The study actually looked at what happened in the fat cells of these participants. Both groups improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and markers of inflammation.

The take away here is that you have options.  You can do a high intensity shorter duration session or a lower intensity longer duration.  Both will add to weight loss and improve cell function.  (Despite the “fat burning” programs on most machines, lower duration is not better for weight /fat loss. This too is a myth.) They study did not mention the difference between the time the two groups had to exercise to burn those 400 calories.  My estimate it would be about 10-15 minutes extra.  Other studies have found that calorie burning can be broken up through the day, and actually may add to more health benefits.  So you might walk moderately for 30 minutes in the morning and then do another 15 min walk at lunchtime. The great news is that exercise does not need to be hard to get the benefits!!!  Something IS better than nothing!

This study just looked at cardiovascular exercise.  Remember, it is important to strive for a balance of time spent between strength training and cardiovascular exercise.  Each provide different benefits and cannot be combined very well.  If you are missing strength training in your exercise minutes, you are missing out.

Keep reading between the headlines and learning about what works best for you.  Although scientists did NOT discover the BEST exercise for weight loss and health, we do have more evidence to keep moving!

Keep Moving, Be Well,
Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

Leave a comment

by | January 18, 2017 · 4:05 pm

Two facts to know if you are dieting

fact

# 1 Dieting lowers metabolism

  • According to a large review study, by about 5.8 calories per day, for each pound lost (7).
  • If you were to lose 50 pounds your body would end up burning 290.5 fewer calories per day.
  • Some studies show it could even be more than that.

#2 Strength training is by far the best way to counteract this lowering of metabolism

  • Even without dieting, inactive adults lose about 3% to 8% of muscle mass per decade, lowering metabolism
    • This loss is increased not only with dieting, but with bed rest (starts within 24 hour)s and certain other medical conditions
    • Ten weeks of strength training can increase resting metabolic rate by 7% or more!
    • Cardiovascular exercise is not as effective as strength training for preserving metabolism (we need both types of exercise).
    • Strength training also has many great “side effects”
      • Improved ability to do daily activities, walking speed, and self-esteem.
      • Prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, lung disease, and bone loss (with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density)
      • Reduced low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia


Enough said!

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

 

 

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by | September 14, 2016 · 5:40 pm