Category Archives: Goals

Attitude for Sustainability

sustainalbeLet’s take a look at one more critical difference between training for athletics/military and training for well-being.

Athletes and military professionals need to train right at the edge of a very fine line between improving skills and risking injury. Athletes and their coaches find that line and push the body as close as possible to that line, in order to stay in the competition. Step over that line and injury risk is greater than the training benefit.

This type of training does not consider what the body will be able to do ten or twenty years from now. It is focused on the next level, improving by pushing that limit as much as possible. There is only so long the body can sustain that type of training. At some point, an athlete needs to retire from competition, or at least semi-retire and take a few steps back from that line if they want to keep moving.

In training for well-being, choosing the level to train at considers what is needed to be well right now, as well as for the rest of our lives. This type of training does not require pushing to that risk/benefit ratio line. To the contrary, part of training for well-being is listening to the body to know when we are stepping too close to that line because we know an injury keeps us on the sidelines of life rather than out enjoying life. Training to be well considers how we feel, now as well as decades from now, by preventing injury, illness, and disease as much as possible. “Retire” from this plan too early, and that risk along with the rate of aging ramps up…fast!!!

Training for well-being means we find the types of movement that give us energy rather than drain it. You might be one who needs more adventurous types of physical activity, such as skiing or rock climbing. Remembering it is more important to be well than excel at that activity keeps it energizing and the risk/benefit ratio in check.

Over the past few years, I’ve noticed the attitude of no, pain no gain, look better, be better, push harder, ignore the body, trick the body, is so enmeshed in the world of fitness we often don’t even see it! The confusion over these two very different ways of training the body has made exercise stressful (which is ironic because when we are stressed, the body preparing to move!). Even the word exercise overwhelms many people, which drains motivation in the long run, causing them to miss out on the great benefits of fitness for well-being.

Bottom Line:  It is not necessarily the activity, but the attitude that makes training for well-being so sustainable. The ultimate goal is feeling better on the inside (rather than getting better at some external goal). Let’s stay aware of activities that are more about proving ourselves instead of being ourselves, because when it is more about well-doing, it can take us away from well-being.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | November 14, 2016 · 4:18 pm

Success Breeds Success!

Success breeds success
Mia Hamm

achievement-star-transparent.png

Who doesn’t like a little pat on the back once in a while. Heck, who would not like one every day!  It is nice to be recognized for an achievement. It gives us a little energy boost, a bit of extra motivation to keep going, to try harder, to overcome obstacles.

Successful leaders know recognition is an important part of keeping a team going.  In fact, according to the book How Full is Your Bucket,  the number-one reason most Americans leave their jobs is that they don’t feel appreciated.

So, who is the CEO of your well-being?  Who is the leader of your weight loss journey?  YOU!  As a smart leader, who knows you do not want to quit your weight loss goal,  how often to do you recognize your achievements?

It can feel self-serving to recognize our own achievements.  However, research consistently shows that self-criticism lowers the chance of reaching a goal. Since finding our faults can be a knee-jerk reaction, we need to make it easier to recognize what is going well or we might automatically end up focus only on what is NOT going well.

Here are tips for making this most effective:

  1. Make it easy.  Keep a daily accomplishments list on something easy to access, such as on your phone or in your daily calendar.  Every day jot down at least one accomplishment.  Whether it is exercising that day, or eating a vegetable, give yourself credit for the achievement.
  2. In the moment.  As soon as you notice an achievement, no matter how small, jot it down so you don’t forget.  (enjoy that pat on the back!)
  3. Be specific.  Instead of just saying “good job”, note exactly what you did.  You might even make a special note if you overcame a challenge in that achievement.  For example, “I did my strength training routine, even though I was tired after work. I felt so much better after!”.
  4. Connect it with the bigger goal.  The more you connect what you are doing with why you are doing it, the more you harness the energy of this goal for you.  For example “I exercised after work giving me more energy for playing with my kids, and that is why I want to lose weight, to have energy to play with my kids”.

When looking back on this list, you will find you have a record of what works well for you.  This is like finding gold in times when you are struggling, looking for ways to get back on track.

I challenge you to try it for a few days, see how it goes for you. (Give yourself credit for at least trying it). Let me know how it goes!

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort
Franklin D. Roosevelt

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

 

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by | October 18, 2016 · 3:36 pm

Fitness Part 3: Choose a destination

many pathsWhen it comes to fitness, there are so many paths to take.  Not all lead to the same destination.  It depends on what you want from fitness. 

Remember the definition….

Physical Fitness= 

The ability to do activities of daily life with ease

and have energy left over for recreation and to meet emergencies.

Choose your destination:  Get clear about what you want from weight loss and exercise, then train for what you want.  If you goal is to do burpies better, then do burpies.  If not, skip the burpies!!!  If your goal is to have the stamina to travel and walk around amazing places with friends and family without fatigue – then walk often at the level your body can do now and gradually build up your tolerance of walking.  Even if you start with 15 seconds several times a day, you are training for YOUR goal.   These are the questions to ask yourself to know where you want to go:

  • What daily activities do I need to do?
  • What do I want to be able to do for fun?
  • What is important for me to be able to do to meet emergencies? (ie: get up off the floor if I fall, be able to climb the stairs)

You are here:  Where are you now?  Again, another important questions if you are going to get the destination you want.  What are you able to do? What gets in the way?  Awareness is key.  Taking a day or two to ponder these questions can make getting to your destination much easier.   Jot down some thoughts before moving forward with your exercise plan.

Stay on course:  How do you know if you are on course?  Expert advice is helpful.   However, what your body is telling you is  more reliable and accurate than any outside measure (like how much weight lifted, how many miles you moved, or the latest fitness trend).  Here are some ways to help you from getting caught in a detour:

  • Physical or mental fatigue:  Learn to tell the difference between feeling tired because you were physically active all day and feeling tired because you were more mentally active.  Mental and physical fatigue can feel the similar. When it is mental fatigue, give your body what it needs by moving in some way.  If you get energy from moment, it was definitely mental fatigue.
  • Tired or lazy?   A better term for lazy is just not motivated.  This is very different than being physically tired.  They can feel the same unless we really take a closer look.  If you are feeling lazy, check to see if your goal is too big and overwhelm is draining motivation. Lower the goal and see if that cures laziness.  Check to see if you have just lost sight of your destination,  the whole reason you want to get moving in the first place.  Remind yourself of your destination and see if that gives you some energy.
  • How do I feel after exercise? If you walk away from exercise feeling worse about yourself or physically exhausted, it was too much!  The right exercise for you right now is the one that makes you feel better physically and mentally. Choose what makes you feel better, and you found what is right for you.  Do that exercise as often as you want to feel better!

More next week….

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | August 1, 2016 · 5:43 pm

Fitness: Part 2- Beware of Detours

detour

Protect yourself from getting off track from the true definition of fitness.  Stay aware of these “detours” that can waste time and can distract from the true goal of living better:

  • Most popular:  Fitness trends come and go. The tendency is to think if it is popular it must be good.   Just because everyone is doing it or talking about it being great, does not mean it is great for you.  Nor does it mean it is based on movement science. Even if they use the word “research” in the ad, it does not mean the research is well done or unbiased.
  • Most challenging:  We tend to think if there is a lot of sweating, muscle soreness and pain, it must be better for us than something more moderate.  The “no pain no gain” approach is for athletes who have to sacrifice comfort for winning.   For healthy fitness there is “no gain in pain”!   If you just want to be healthy and enjoy life more, a “comfortable challenge” is the goal.    Moderate intensity really does work for health, well-being and weight loss.   Extreme challenges in exercise get so much media coverage it can seem like discomfort is the goal.  Stay aware! If it is uncomfortable it is not sustainable.  Consistency is key for healthy fitness.
  • Most expensive:  Marketing professionals know – if something is more expensive, consumers believe it is better.  The truth is,  a bottle filled with water weighing 5lbs is the same 5lbs as the most expensive dumbbell.  Your muscles do not know the difference if you are lifting an expensive weight or a “free” weight. Walking and dancing are free, and great forms of exercise.

 

Take a look at your list from last week.   What do you want and need to be able to do to enjoy life more?  Keep focused on that list.  Be aware of the lure of the quick, expensive, and most popular fixes – and you will stay on the road to true health and fitness.

More next week…

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | July 25, 2016 · 7:20 pm

Fitness Part 1: A Helpful Definition

confusing

Figuring out which way to go with fitness can be quite confusing.  News about the latest research study is discussed in the media, then a conflicting study is reported the next day.   Many “fitness experts” giving their recommendation about what is the best way to get fit.

How do I know what is the best exercise? How do I know what is right for me?  Who do I listen to for reliable advice? 

This is a three part blog to help clear things up a bit.

Lets start with the definition of fitness:

Physical Fitness:

The ability to do activities of daily life with ease

and have energy left over for recreation and to meet emergencies. 

Really!  That’s fitness!  Fitness is about living life easier.  Fitness means having the ability to do what you need to do and want to do.  It is not about how much weight you can lift or how many miles you can run or how many steps you have taken.  Those are different ways to measure fitness in general.  The true measure of fitness is very specific to how well you can do what you want and need to do in daily life.   Your choices in fitness are best when based on YOUR life and YOUR goals.

A basic exercise principle is “you get what you train for”.  So knowing what you want out of fitness is the place to start so you can decide what type of exercise is right for you.

It make sense then, that the first questions are:

  1. What do I need to be able to do?
  2. What do I want to be able to do?

Start by brainstorming answers to these two questions.

More next week…

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

 

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | July 19, 2016 · 4:33 pm

How to Set Successful Exercise Goals

goals 3This time of year it is common to see all kinds of advice on goal setting.  As I read through the articles though, I realize there are some unique aspects of setting physical activity goals for weight loss.Goal setting is important.  There is a science to goal setting that increases the chances of success:

A study conducted by Gail Matthews, Ph.D., at the Dominican University, found three factors that increased success:
1. Written Goals:  Those who wrote their goals accomplished 50% more of their goals than those who did not write their goals.  Use the format below to write down your goals.
2. Shared Goals: those who told a friend about their goal accomplished more.
3. Accountability:    A regular check in with another person increased rates of success .  This does not need to be complicated, a simple text to an accountability buddy would work.

This is also supported by a recent study by our own Sherry Pagoto, PhD on using social media for support and accountability.

In the last support group meeting we chatted about the SMARTER acronym for goal setting.  The SMARTER system is a very useful formula for increasing the chances of success.  While there are several variations of this method, I find there are specific ways to make it most powerful for exercise and weight loss goals.
Specific – The more specifics in the way the goal is stated, the more chance your mind will stay focused on the goal. Goals that are vague are difficult for the mind to maintain focus on.   The nice part about exercise goals is we can get very specific.  What is one thing you can start doing regularly right now for physical activity that will have an impact on your weight goal?  Now make it as specific as possible, including the when, where, how’s.  IE:  I will walk every day for 15 minutes after work, I will do these three  stretches for my back every morning before breakfast, I will do these 6 strength training exercises every other day at 7pm after dinner, one set of 15 repetitions each.  Include in these specifics who will be your accountability buddy.What will I specifically start doing for physical activity?  Is this measurable?  Who will keep me accountable on this goal?
Meaningful – Why are you setting this goal?  Why do you want to do strength training, walk, stretch?   State what is important about it more that just to lose weight.    Make the connection between why you are exercising and the real underlying reason you want to be at a certain weight.  This taps into your natural lasting motivation.   I want to be able to play with my kids, be more independent, be around for my grand-kids, be more effective at my job, keep my home clean, feel good about myself when I get dressed.   The more important the “why” is to you, the more motivation you will have for the specific actions you need to take to reach your goals.Why is this goal important to me?
Achievable – Success is motivating.  Setting goals that are just within reach creates enough of a challenge to keep interest in them, but not too overwhelming to drain motivation.  I find most people set an exercise goal that is way to big to start.  We tend to need more practice with setting the small goals.    If you have a big goal,  set it as a long-term goal for one to five years from now.  Chip away a  much smaller version of that for a very short term 3 month goal.  Three months is long enough to achieve something but short enough to make it urgent.
How confident are you that you can achieve this goal?  If your confidence is low, go back and chip away some more until you come up with a goal you feel confident about achieving.
Relevant – This step reminds us to look at our goals in terms of what is important to us.  When our goals match with what we really want more of in life, the motivation to stick with them is easier.   Make your exercise program very specific to what you want to be able to do in the future.  Create a program that is training you for what you want to do in the future – kayak, ski, dance, climb stairs, get up and down off the floor.   When you are in training for your healthy future, you are as motivated as an athlete with his eye on the goal medal.How will this exercise plan train me for what I really want to do more of in life?
Time-Bound –  Start today!  Not on Monday or the first of the month.    Motivation will not be stronger later.  Waiting only reinforces the procrastination habit.  If you set goals with meaning and relevance, you won’t want to wait to start . So if you are tempted to put it off, it is a sure sign it is too overwhelming or not meaningful enough. Go back to the first steps and create a goal you cannot wait to start.   If there is some prep work like joining a gym or getting new sneakers make those the first goals, but still make your actual start date today.    Write the three-month end date on your calendar as well as on the top of your written goals.  This will be a reminder each time you look at them. My three-month goal date is______________?  In order to get there, today I will __________________________.
Evaluate Every Day – This daily check in will keep you close to your goal.  Again, goals that are set on meaning and relevance to your life are a tool for maintaining motivation. Review your goal every day to keep you focused on why you are making efforts.  With exercise goals especially it is easy to let a week or two go by without exercise.  Daily reminder will prevent them from becoming an after thought thgoals 4at just leaves you feeling guilty.  Evaluate in a way that you are observing  what works and what gets in the way without judging.  Simply notice what is going well and where you need some extra support. Keep it quick and easy so you can stick with this important step in the process.How will I evaluate this goal each day?  How will I include my accountability buddy in this evaluation process?
Readjust – The evaluating step leads into this.  As you learn what is working and what is not, re-adjusting will be needed.  We take our best guess on goals.  Learning only lets us be more specific and realistic.  Reworking the goal based upon what you learn is not a cop-out, it is a “smarter” way to achieve your true goals.

 

Wishing you a Happy, Healthy New Year!

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

If you know someone interested in weight loss surgery, forward this link to the Weight Center website and online orientation video

If you’re in the process of preparing for weight loss surgery at the Weight Center and have questions about your status or next steps, call 774-443-3886

If you’ve had weight loss surgery at the Weight Center and you’re due for a follow up appointment with one of our providers, call 774-443-3886 or email to weightcenter@umassmemorial.org

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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Filed under Barriers, Goals, Holidays, Inspiration, Motivation, Success, support, Weight Loss

Keep Moving Through the Season

time changeIt’s that transition week.  The week that we have to adjust to the changes in daylight and nighttime hours.

How does this affect your exercise motivation?

Living in New England,  late fall and winter can be the most challenging time to stay active.

So… What is the plan this year? 

What did you learn from last year about what worked, and what did not work?

As we do with all the changing seasons – I invite you to write down your plan and share it with someone.

Feel free to email it to me, or post it in comments.

We have had a bit of a bonus this year with the lovely weather these past weeks.  Lets take advantage of it and make the plan now so we are ready when the you know what starts falling.

spring trainingKeep in mind, this is spring training! We have the next four months to train for an awesome active spring!

I look forward to hearing all the creative ways you plan on spring training this year.

Here is an article on how Mindfulness can help boost motivation.

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

 

 

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by | November 5, 2015 · 9:37 pm