Category Archives: Dealing with Pain Issues

“I want to love exercise (again)”

love exercise Perhaps  you have never understood those people who love exercise.

Or maybe you long to love it again, the way you used to years ago.

Either way there is hope!

Many times I feel like a matchmaker…. I help patients find a form or approach to exercise they can fall in love with.  When they do, their face lights up, just like they found Mr. or Ms. Right!

Below are challenges that can eat away at your relationship with exercise and some ideas of how to patch things up:

  • Pain:  No one would argue that no pain, no gain is no fun!  With the exception of exercising with arthritis, exercise should not hurt.  Let me repeat that – exercise should not hurt!  Even with arthritis the pain should be the “normal” arthritis pain not the “uh oh Ive done too much” pain.   Pain eventually saps motivation
    • When you are choosing an exercise plan, as yourself how sustainable the program is in your life. Those high intensity programs we try in an effort to lose weight might work in the short term – but will you want to keep doing it to keep the weight off?
    • Address current or potential pain issues before starting a program
      • See a physical therapist to rehabilitate current pain issues and gain a better understanding of what to avoid
      • Most pain, because it is from strain on a joint that builds up over time, can be reduced by paying attention to daily activities.  Learn about how your pain is affected by your posture, footwear, sitting position, sleeping position, and how you do daily tasks
    • Find activities that don’t add to the wear and tear on that area, like seated aerobics.   Remember these are short term solutions to eventually get to back to enjoying the activities you love.
    • Start with several small bouts during the day.  Often pain from exercise is simply from doing too much too soon.
    • Start with strength training.  We often focus so much on cardio and forget that strength training burns as many calories.  Plus strengthening the joint in the right way is a great way provide support and reduce pain.  Start with light weights and build up gradually
    • Stretch!  Tight muscles pull on joints just like out-of-alignment wheels cause wear and tear on a car.   Stretching is about re-setting muscles to their resting length and reducing inflammation.  It is a key part of pain management
  • Self-conscious:  If you avoid exercise because you are uncomfortable around others, you are not alone!   It’s OK to exercise at home alone for a while and skip the gym if you just are not ready to exercise around other people
  • Fear:
    • Personal safety:  Pay attention to this instinct and find a place to exercise you feel safe
    • Injury:  Fearing a heart attack or joint injury with exercise can definitely keep motivation low.  Learning about how to keep exercise safe is important.  Generally it is much safer to exercise than to be sedentary,  especially when you find the right type and amount of exercise for your body right now
  • Fatigue:love exerise 2
    • Getting enough sleep is essential for weight loss and for enjoying exercise.  If you have sleep issues, like sleep apnea, get them under control before setting big goals for exercise
    • Exercise can improve sleep quality.  Try some light to moderate exercise in the morning or afternoon to see if it helps with sleep issues
    • Do the mental fatigue or physical fatigue test -(they can feel the same!)  Try 10 minutes of light to moderate exercise. If your energy increases, it was mental fatigue. If you feel more tired it is more likely physical fatigue. In this case stick with several small bouts a day until endurance is improved
  • Out of date goals:  Trying to get back to doing what you used to do may not be a realistic goal.  It might keep you in the vicious cycle of all or nothing exercise.  Instead, start slow and gradual with a type of exercise that feels comfortable for your body now.   Focus on what is possible right now.
  • Lack of Know How:  Learning how to exercise the right way is not easy.  There are so many exercise programs based upon myths, sports training, assumptions, or folk-lore. It can be difficult to know what is the right way to exercise.  Especially when carrying extra weight – the body needs different approaches to movement.   Truth is, you are the best expert on your body.  Learn from  exercise professionals with a degree in exercise or movement science and listen to what is right for your body right now.  The combination will lead you to enjoying exercise now and for a long time to come.
  • Lack of equipment/Money:   Look at all the commercials and infomercials out there and it can seem like it is expensive to exercise.   Movement is free and requires very little if any equipment.    Your dedication to sticking with it is more important than having great equipment.

I have seen the magic of making these small adjustments in approach to exercise.  They can create a strong and lasting relationship that leads to success with weight loss.

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

3 Comments

by | September 4, 2015 · 6:37 pm

Mindful in May

 

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Just a quick post to let you know about Mindful in May global online mindfulness meditation campaign.

What is Mindful in May? It takes just 10 minutes a day to bring more focus and effectiveness into your daily life. Join a global community of people bringing mindfulness meditation into their lives and making a positive impact on the lives of others.

If you have been hearing about the great benefits of meditation, but need some extra support to make it a habit, this support could help.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

2 Comments

by | April 30, 2015 · 3:50 pm

Happiness and Exercise

I am currently enjoying reading the book Hardwiring Happiness by Dr. Rick Hanson.Hardwire

It is full of interesting information about how our brains are hardwired to look for problems to be solved. This is normal and kept us safe for many, many years.   In our modern-day however, there is a need to shift to looking for what is good in each moment.  We are no longer as threatened by physical harm, our stress today is more mental and emotional.   He discusses how simply shifting to focus on what is going well changes our brains ability to cope with stress and helps improve health as a result.

What does this have to do with exercise? Continue reading

2 Comments

by | April 16, 2015 · 6:44 pm

Reducing Weight Without Losing Weight – Part II

This is a comment a patient posted in the stretching blog last month.  I had to share her inspiring words:   I’m 8 months post gastric sleeve and have lost 172 lbs since July 2013! Been in PT since October 15, 2014 twice a week. I had to start in the pool i was so bad, but ive graduated to all office visits and I’m getting stronger by the day! I became disabled due to disk disease and got to the point we’re I sat in a recliner for 8 year because my pain became intolerable. I started PT so I could start to walk again and they found so many more problems, my knees are bent from sitting for so long so they need to be manipulated every visit, extremely painful. What I’m getting too is, stretching is crucial to my recovery program. All my muscles had become so bad from sitting that stretching them is an everyday thing for me. When my sciatic starts bothering me I have a stretch where I sit with my foot on the opposite knee stretching my lower back muscle and I’ll tell you it actually works. I have gained enough strength that I can now walk through Walmart when I was only able to use the cart for years!!! I can shower standing up, cook, clean, and none of it would have been possible without PT and the stretching and exercise I do there! I just wanted to share with you my experience and how important stretching is to my everyday recovery.

Thanks to those of you who send along some help with my car dilemma I appreciate your advice 🙂

The big point in the last blog was that how we hold our body changes our body on a cellular level – for better or worse.  And the amount of time we spend in a position has a direct impact on how much it will improve or deteriorate how our body feels. 

How we sit and stand affects everything from our joints, muscles, digestion, breathing, focus, and probably a lot more.

What did you notice last week about how you sit and stand? 

Here are some very basic and simple points to pay attention to.  As always these are general suggestions and guidelines and I trust you to do what feels best for your body: 

  • Standing as best you can, keep your feet parallel to each other (notice if your default position is with toes pointing in or out)Picture-21
  • feet under hips (not wide apart and not too close)
  • weight in heels – this is a BIG one.  (the goal is the picture on the right in red. The picture on the left in blue shows the effect of weight in the toes)when your weight is more on the front of the feet – notice what happens to the hips.  They push forward.  This puts extra pressure on the front of the feet, the knees, the front of the belly and the lower back. The shoulders and head tend to move out of alignment too.  Practice keeping your weight in your heels and hips when standing. 
  • lower back in neutral – not flat and not rounded.  There should  be a comfortable curve in the lower back and the hips should be in neutral
  • ribs facing hips – this is another big one.  Place your hand on your breastbone (sternum) – it should be close to vertical to the ground.  When we “stand up straight” the ribs tend to flare forward.  This causes strain in the back and takes the shoulders out of healthy alignment.  
  • roll the shoulders open – the inside of the elbow facing forward and shoulders and chest rolled open – Check the ribs again to be sure they did not flare forward again.   Remember….ribs down, shoulders back
  • head balanced on shoulders – ears over shoulders

Do the same when sitting just keeping feet on floor under knees. Then balance your weight on your hips so the lower back is in neutral andthCAWVYXYC move up from there with the description above.  Sitting with the back curved, like when slouching or sitting back  on a couch creates more work for the lower back. 

This is a simply way we can improve health in moments during our day.  When muscles and joints are hurting they are just letting you know they are over worked. Much of the time this is from positioning during the day. 

Posture-Before-AfterWhen pain is reduced from proper alignment, motivation to move increases.  With the body aligned properly, risk of injury with exercise is less.  So… all of this alignment awareness can lead to more movement and help with weight loss. 

Think beyond the gym for health and well-being and healthy weight. 

 

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet 

 

2 Comments

by | March 18, 2015 · 4:27 pm

Reducing Weight without Losing Weight

thCABPF7GPI took a car for a test drive this week. My current car is a 2004 and I have the seat perfectly adjusted so I can sit in alignment. Sitting in this 2010 car my head was pushed forward by the head rest. No matter how I adjusted the seat I could not sit with my hips shoulders and ears in alignment. That darn head rest kept pushing my head forward.

So, I asked the car salesman.   He said that not too long ago the government changed the guidelines for manufacturing car seats. They wanted to make sure that the head is on the head rest….. so they moved the head rest forward…

Does anyone see a HUGE red flag here?

Were the older cars wrong? Or, could it be that our bodies have “adapted” to our new computer working, cell phone gazing, sitting shape? Please say it isn’t so! The government, in trying to keep us safe (which I greatly appreciate), adapted the guidelines to fit this new position of our body?thCA2EI8K7

What is the big deal you may ask.

Take an object about 10 lbs.and hold it in your hands. Notice the weight. Now extend your arms so you are holding it in front of you with your arms straight. The weight did not change but it feels heavier, right?

Now think of your head (weighs about 10 lbs.) held up by your neck. With the head jutted forward those poor neck muscles are working over time. And then the back muscles need to help out.

Exercise is important. But it is only about 3% of our day if we do 45 minutes of exercise a day. The other 97% of our day is hugely thCAJSWG40important. How we hold our body during most of the day can be a breeding ground for chronic pain and injury. It can also be the breeding ground for health and well-being. It is our choice.

This week: pay attention to your body position in daily activities like driving, eating, reading, watching TV, working on a computer, brushing your teeth, talking on the phone, looking at your smart phone.

  • Notice where your head is in relation to your body.
  • Notice where you feel your weight most when sitting – on your tailbone and back, front of your hips or in the middle.
  • Notice the weight of your arms and legs.
  • Notice where your weight is on your feet when standing – on the toes, heels or in-between.
  • Which side of the body do you use more?
  • Which side do you put more weight on when sitting, standing or carrying?

Feel free to add your comments about what you notice and we will continue the chat next week…

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

 

 

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by | March 12, 2015 · 6:16 pm