Author Archives: keepitmovingweekly2

Avoiding a Detour

I just finished the book Presence by Amy Cuddy. If you have not seen her TED talk, I highly recommend it.  Dr. Cuddy is a researcher who studies how our body language shapes our behavior. The  book is filled with amazing evidence from her research* and a whole slew of others, about how our body position changes how we think and behave.

detour-44160__480Sustainable weight loss is about keeping ourselves on course when detours pop up.    You come to the end of a VERY long day and you planned on walking, but it is cold and rainy and all you want to do is go home and veg out on the couch.  You are in the midst of a week of chaos in your life and you can’t even think of getting to the gym for  strength training. You get on the scale and feel completely defeated because, despite your best efforts, it is two pounds up!

What if we could get derailed less and back on track easier? What if it was something with research behind it that was simple, free, and completely accessible to you in any moment?  Would you try it?  Even if it seemed a bit strange and unlikely to make a difference?

It turns out that when our body is in a position with shoulders and back rounded we feel less confident.  We are less likely to make choices that are in line with what is most important to us.

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But, when we stand with shoulders and chest open, we are more confident, more likely to stick with what is most important to us.

high power pose

 

It is interesting that across many different cultures and situations, the most common expression of success is raising arms up in a “V”.   We now have some evidence this may work in reverse too!

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Give it a try!  Next time you step in the scale, put your hands on your hips and stand like your favorite superhero!  In the middle of a stressful day, stand or sit in alignment with your body strong.  When you are tempted to skip exercise, stand or sit with your arms up in a “victory” position for two minutes.

Post what happens in the comments section below!

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

*You may have heard some news flashes years ago debunking Dr. Cuddy’s research.  If you read her book, you will see that her study on power poses are just one in many showing there is something powerful in the way we hold our body.  Research is tricky business and one study does not prove anything.  Your best evidence is to try this for yourself and see how it works for you. 

 

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | May 15, 2017 · 5:38 pm

Myth #10 – Toning and Sculpting

Words and images promoting toning and sculpting the body through exercise seem to be  everywhere we turn.   The wonders of technology provide us with images of people going from flabby to firm arms and legs and from muffin-top to muscular core.  The technology makes it look so easy… and possible.

Unfortunately these tout the wonders of computer science rather than movement science.  The body does not burn more fat in an area when we exercise that area.  So sit ups and triceps exercise will not but fat in these “problem areas”.  We just do not have as much control over how exercise makes our body appear as the popular images lead us to believe.   Fortunately there are real benefits of exercise and focusing on them keeps us motivated with real results!

What does work?

  1. A healthy attitude of self  kindness for the body you do have!  Research consistently shows that people who are kind and compassionate to themselves when making healthy changes are much more likely to stick to those changes than those who are critical of themselves.
  2. Let go of the idea that you can spot reduce (exercise a part of the body to lose more fat there).  It is just not science based!   As an example, go back to our discussion of the true job of core exercises as a guide for true exercise in this area of the body.  When you see ads with images of changed bodies, know the images have most likely been altered to get your attention.  Its just not reality based.
  3. Be consistent with a balance between cardiovascular exercise and strength training in the ways we have

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    been discussing here on Keep Moving Weekly.

  4. Set function goals rather than “form” goals.  We have much more control over how our body functions than how it looks.  What do you want to be easier?  Golf? Playing with children? Climbing stairs? Travel? Housecleaning? Walking?  Develop your exercise plan based on how you want to function better.  Based on the reality of how the body works, these goals lead to lasting motivation.
  5. Work within your genetics.   If your goal is to look better, instead of trying to “get a body” that looks like someone else,  be the best you that you can be.
  6. Celebrate You! Keep yourself off the downward spiral of comparison, competition and self-criticism.  Set your own goals based on what you want and what is really possible and celebrate each day what you accomplished to get there.

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | May 3, 2017 · 6:06 pm

The All-in-One Gauge

gasImagine if the gas gauge on a car measured everything – gas, oil, windshield wiper fluid, water?   Just one gauge for everything together.  How helpful would that gauge be for you?  How would you know what it needed when the gauge was on low?

The scale measures everything – fat, muscle, water, food, clothing – all together in one gauge.   Why then, do we put so much emotion into what it says?

Scale goes down – elation!  Scale goes up – frustration!

Even if it was up because you were on Prednisone that week, or your legs were swollen – that higher number can be so frustrating.  And if it goes down quickly – even if you know that 30% of what was lost was muscle because you were not doing strength training, elation still happens!

Yes, we weigh you here at the Weight Center and look for that number to go down. It is our best objective tool to know that what you are doing is helping.  But it is by no means a perfect tool.    It’s an “all in one” gauge!  That would not be helpful on your car, and it is certainly not helpful if that’s all we use to measure success with healthy lifestyle changes.

So we use other gauges.  How do you feel?  Do you have more energy?  How are you doing with emotional eating? Are you able to do more now than you could before?  Are your clothes fitting better?   Are you doing strength training?  These are the other measures we use as a guide because the scale is an “all in one” guage.

Next time you step on the scale, keep in mind it is an all-in-one measurement.  Use your other measures to really guide you with how your lifestyle changes are working.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | April 26, 2017 · 6:56 pm

May Post-Bariatric Surgery Support Group

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by | April 20, 2017 · 7:38 pm

“All in!” Patient Perspective

jump-1209647__480Being “all in”  separates the goals we set because we “should…” from the goals we set because we “REALLY want…!”

Lets face it, trying to do something because we should is exhausting.  Working for something we REALLY want is energizing.  Below is one patients story of what happens when you go “all in”.  Although this is a patient who decided to have weight loss surgery, the approach can be applied to any goal set because we want to enjoy life to the fullest.

First, let me start by saying that when I went to the original orientation meeting for the Weight Center, I had absolutely no intention of having surgery. I was thinking that I could lose weight with behavior modification. Heck, I’d done it before. Of course, the weight always came back, usually those pounds brought a few friends with them. To consolidate this, I did have a sleeve mastectomy in 2014. At first, I reluctantly pursued an exercise regimen, because I was *told* that this was part of the program, not because I actually wanted to. My mindset at that time was simply this, I had gone through all the preparation and such to have the procedure done, I may as well do the work – this might be my last opportunity to be healthy (note, I did NOT say “skinny”).

I’m by no means saying that I’m perfect, or that anyone should see me as an example of what you *should* do. But I found, over time, that success becomes its best motivation. For every thing I suddenly realized I could do that I could never do before, I wanted to do more. Success is insidious and addictive. People who haven’t “been there” have no idea how empowering it can become to be able to MOVE, to do things that darn near felt like a near death experience before. Over the course of the last 2 1/2 years since my surgery, I’ve gone from being a card-carrying couch potato to working out nearly every day for an average of 45-60 minutes. I bought into the mindset that long term success requires total lifestyle change. It’s not a finite endeavor with some “end goal”, after which you can go back to your old habits. They’re what got you to the point of seeking surgery.

I’ve heard others say things like “I don’t want to deprive myself”, or “I don’t exercise, but I’m still losing weight”, and in inwardly cringe. These people just don’t seem to understand that bariatric surgery isn’t some magic pill that is going to fix what’s wrong…. it is merely a tool that can be used to aid in major changes in behavior. In order to be successful long term, you really DO have to go “all in” and exercise as well. No matter if your stomach is the size of a hard boiled egg or a Winnebago, exercise will *always* be a part of achieving a healthy body.

I went “all in”, and I still have work to do to reach my goal weight, but that is really secondary to what is truly important – being healthy. My advice, for what it’s worth is this: embrace the whole shebang, you might curse the process in the beginning, but when you see and feel your own success, you’ll be eternally grateful you did it.

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Keep Moving, Be Well, Be All In!

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | April 10, 2017 · 3:18 pm

Myth #9: “It will be easier when…”

crocus-292306__480If you ever doubt humans are optimistic, talk to a New Englander in spring!   As the snow melts, so does the weight of winter on our motivation to move.  We feel the hope of longer days and walking outside without fear of slipping on ice.  Its wonderful!!!

Now, I don’t want to be a buzz kill.  I believe in optimism and do not want to squash any of it . However, I know from experience, a bit of realism this time of year can help us stay optimistic all year long.

OK… Brace your self – here comes the reality… Winter will return.  Breathe…. it will be OK!  Lets use this optimistic energy to ready ourselves now for next winter.  As they say “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!”

Chose your favorite way to take notes and  jot down your thoughts:

  • How does my body feels right now at the end of winter? 
  • How do I want it to feel?
  • What was my best experience with exercising during the winter months?
  • What did I learn from that experience I can use now?
  • What are the challenges to exercising in the winter?
  • What do I want to try next winter based upon what I know about my successes and challenges? 

Take your plan and put it where you will see it in October of this year.  Now you can rest easy knowing winter may be a bit easier with a plan in place.

Keep in mind, this optimism also shows up when we are setting out on a weight loss bicycle-788733__480plan.  The idea that “when I lose weight things will be easier”, can cause us to put off dealing with the true challenges to exercising regularly.  Take an honest look here as well.  What challenges will not go away not matter how much you weight?  What can you do to build your confidence in handling them now rather than hoping they will take care of themselves when you are at your goal weight.

Ok, enough realism! Lets get back to that Spring optimism!

Keep Moving, Be Well,
Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

Leave a comment

by | April 4, 2017 · 4:08 pm

Myth #8: The Fitness “Expert”

Fitness expert

When you seek a professional to give you advice or provide a service, whether it is for electrical wiring in your home or getting a haircut, what do you look for? Of course you look to a source you can trust – a professional with the required certification, training, and experience.  It is important to know that the field of fitness has no requirements for professionals. Anyone can call themselves a fitness expert. Our source for advice about how to move and be well is sadly under-regulated and as a result, full of myths and mindsets that are not science-based. This means that right now, you, as a fitness consumer, need to stay educated or your exercise advice may lead you in the opposite direction of the motivation and fitness you are seeking.

Next time you listen to advice about exercise on TV or the internet, notice why they call themselves an “expert.”  Are they highlighting that they  a) have a personal success story,  b) were successful as an athlete, or c) trained someone famous? These are all red flags! Even if they are certified, know that there are no requirements for certification programs and no one is ensuring that person’s certification is up to date. Our professional organizations for degrees and certified exercise professionals are working on this, but it is a very slow process!

Currently, there are two sites that provide helpful information about fitness professionals for consumers. Use these sites to find a qualified professional who holds a certification that is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). This means the certification exam has met set standards for the exercise professional’s role as defined by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The United States Registry of Exercise Professionals maintains a list of professionals with any accredited certification. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) is the “gold standard” for certifying exercise professionals. The ACSM continuously clarifies the various levels of training for exercise professionals,  defining their role and scope of practice clearly. This makes it easier to find a professional who has the right level of training for you, whether you are without health concerns and looking for a qualified personal trainer or have a health concern and need a clinical exercise professional to safely guide you with exercise. Check the ACSM ProFinder to find professionals with this level of certification and training in your area.

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The myth here is that just because someone looks fit they know about how to help you get fit too.   Most important is to trust your instincts.   If the advice you are receiving is not leading to feeling better right away, keep searching for the right professional for you.  Remember, you don’t need to suffer now to feel good later. If exercise is causing increased pain, speak up.  If the professional you are working with tells you the pain is necessary to lose weight,  walk away from it and find a new approach.   My hope is that some day, this will be easier for you as a consumer. Until then, let’s not let the confusion get in the way of exercising consistently and enjoying movement.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

Leave a comment

by | March 28, 2017 · 4:10 pm