Author Archives: keepitmovingweekly2

Coincidence? I don’t think so!

You may have seen this news story  about a couple who met at the gym. (If you haven’t check out this inspiring story.)   Couples meet at gyms all the time.   However these newlyweds met against the odds.  She is 98 and he is 94!  Is it a coincidence that they met at the gym?  Or is there a connection between the fact that they both exercise regularly and have the energy to start a new relationship in their nineties?

“People always ask what it is that keeps us young,” Mr. Mann said. “Of course, one part of it is medical science, but the bigger part is that we live worry-free lives; we do not let anything we cannot control bother us in the least.”

“Age doesn’t mean a damn thing to me or to Gert,” he said. “We don’t see it as a barrier. We still do what we want to do in life.”

Exercise has been shown to slow the aging process in everything from our muscles and brain and even our DNA!

For example, telomeres are the “end-caps” on chromosomes.  They shorten as we age as well as with certain health concerns such as elevated body weight, smoking and type II diabetes.   Studies have shown that they do not shorten as fast in people who exercise.  This discovery explains one way exercise slows the aging process in ways we can’t see by looking in the mirror.

These regular exercisers, slowed their aging process and thus are getting more out of life!  The bride was a two term mayor of their town at 71 years old.  The groom received his bachelors degree in history at 94!

Are they superhuman?

Are they just lucky?

Nope! They are fit!

 

Keep Moving, Be well,

Janet

 

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | August 15, 2017 · 8:19 pm

Thank You New York Times!

I came across this article “is it good to sweat” from the New York Times Ask Well section.

Sweating is one myth that seems to hang around in the fitness world no matter what the science says.  Check it out if you find yourself thinking sweat = a good workout.

Don’t sweat it! Just Keep Moving and Be Well,

Janet

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by | August 2, 2017 · 6:09 pm

Save time: Cut the Core Classes

Core-Class-PicLast week while on vacation I was exercising at a gym, which I don’t do often.  It was a great chance to do some “field research”, providing many blog topics 🙂

The biggest tip I want to share is – please do not waste time going to a core exercise class.  I observed 20 people wasting a perfectly good half hour on the floor doing all kinds of exercises for their abdominal muscles.  Why wasting time? Two big reasons:

  1. It’s not how the core is designed to work:  One job of the core muscles is to stabilize and protect the spine when the body moves.  Another is to provide a strong foundation for all movement because when the trunk is aligned and stable, the upper and lower body can be stronger with less wear and tear.   Working on each of the abdominal muscles individually while laying down does not mean they will know how to do their job during activities of everyday life.   When we incorporate activating the core while using the arms and legs it learns to support, stabilize and protect in the way it was designed.
  2. Spot reducing is a myth:  All that time working on this “trouble spot” in the body will not burn more fat around the middle.  Its just not how the body works.  Why then, would it be worth using a significant amount of your exercise time “working” on your core? I cannot think of a reason.  Instead use that time to do quality strength training for your whole body while incorporating your core muscles into those movements.  The result will be a greater impact on your metabolism, core muscles that know how to do their job well, and time left over to do more of what you enjoy in life.

I do realize this is a big shift from what is highly popular in the media right now.  Notice this week how much fitness marketing and social media focus on ineffective core exercises with promises of spot reducing.  However, you as the savvy fitness consumer know better.  If you are a Weight Center patient and want instruction on how to incorporate your core into your strength training, let me know and we will set up an appointment.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | July 25, 2017 · 1:52 pm

The connection between “Being Good” and “Being Bad”

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This was a segment on NPR yesterday about a study on why we might tend to “be bad” after “being good” .

When you are an experienced dieter, you know how to “be good”.  You know all the rules and tricks in order to take in less and burn more calories.  You could probably could write a book on it!

It is interesting to learn from research in the field of marketing.  It gives us great clues in to what drives us, what motivates our decisions .   This term used called “licensing” is a handy one. It describes that switch that seems to happen when we have been following the plan closely for a while and then suddenly, without warning, we switch and make a complete 180 degree turn to do the exact opposite of what we know we “should do.

When we are trying at achieve a goal like weight loss, we can get really focused on all the rules.  We follow what someone else tells us we need to do and try really hard to stick with it.   We can become like a child sitting at a fancy restaurant trying really hard to be polite, use good manners and sit still. Eventually, they will lose it (hopefully not in the restaurant!).  Its like trying to hold our breath – there is only so long we can try hard to ignore signals from our body to do what we want and need to do.

Stringent, intense, hard-core exercise programs put us in that position.  We are working so hard to measure up, to perform, to keep up, to ignore pain and fatigue signals from our body.  That it can only last so long.  Eventually we are going to head in the complete opposite direction.

Moderation is key.  It is not glamorous, flashy or newsworthy, but it works when it comes to exercise.  Studies indicate moderate intensity of cardiovascular exercise  is enough to improve stamina.  Moderate amounts of training, like one set three days a week, works to improve strength.

So moderate is enough and pushing hard makes us lose motivation…. hmmmm   maybe we can finally lose the idea that we need to try to be good and not be bad and simply enjoy moving again!

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

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by | July 11, 2017 · 7:00 pm

It’s summer! Stop trying, start playing!

Dive-in-WaterThe drive to work is easier this time of year; no school buses or crossing guards, less cars on the road and, with the exception of the seasonal road construction, it is pretty smooth and enjoyable.   I was thinking this morning how it makes up for the months of traffic headaches with ice, huge snow piles, and more vehicles in the winter months.

Life is dynamic.    The challenging times come and go. The enjoyable times come and go.  Its all normal.  It can seem like the challenges come more often and stay longer than the easy and enjoyable times though?  We are not just imagining things when life seems more challenging than enjoyable.  Our brain has a “negativity bias”. It is set up to look for what is wrong, could go wrong, or did go wrong, in order to keep us safe.  Rick Hanson puts it this way “negative thoughts are like Velcro, and positive ones are like Teflon”.

This effects how we approach exercise.  We try really hard to exercise away what is wrong with our bodies.  We try tricks to fix our low motivation.   We try to fit it into our already full schedules.  We try to push our body to be stronger, faster, better.    With all this trying to fix what is wrong we forget that movement itself has been a resource for celebrating life for all of time.  rwanda-1229760.jpg

Its summer! Time for taking it easy, resting, having fun, enjoying life a bit!   How about we stop trying with exercise and just enjoy moving?  Put on music and dance.  Play with kids.  Walk to discover a new place.

Three years ago I wrote this blog on the health benefits of play. Could it be that all this “trying” is leading us to miss out on the true benefits of moving – to enjoy life a bit more?  What would happen if we stopped trying and start playing?  Simply enjoy moving in any way, for however long, and as often as your body allows you to.  No rules, just move in a playful way.

It might be worth a try.  What we have been doing to “try” to move more has not been working. In the past 18 years the amount of people who get the recommended amounts of exercise has increased from 16% to 20%!  4% in 18 years!  No business would survive with that growth rate!  Could part of the problem be that exercise has become more about guilt, dread, pain, and fatigue rather than  relaxation, recreation, and rejuvenation?

Lets see what happens between now and Labor day if we simply think of exercise as a way to play and enjoy life more!

Enjoy Moving, Be Well!

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | July 5, 2017 · 6:34 pm

Breathing

Take a deep breath.  How does it feel?  Relaxing or tense? Try it again.  Take a deep breath and this time pause after the inhale.  Are your shoulders up? Is your chest lifted? Where do you feel your breath, in the upper, or lower part of your torso?

We are often told to take a deep breath to relax.  When we take a deep breath, for several reasons we tend to breathe “up”, creating more tension than relaxation.

Breathing is an automatic process. When we try to fool with it, we usually make it less efficient.  Watch a child sleeping and you see a natural breath. Their whole torso expands and relaxes as they breathe.  As we grow and become more aware of our body, and perhaps a bit (or a lot) more self conscious about our belly, we can subconsciously try to hide this area.  Taking a deep belly breath is uncomfortable because the last thing we want to do is make our belly bigger!  Instead we tend to breathe up, not deep into our belly, making a “deep breath” not a relaxing at all!

Place onbreathing-2029614__480e hand at the bottom of your rib cage. Place the other on your collar bones.  This is the length of your lungs. Now place your hands on the side of your rib cage and feel the width of your lungs.  If you can, place your hand in the front and back of the rib cage and feel the depth of your lungs.

Now try taking a breath in these three dimensions.  Let your rib cage and lungs expand  – side to side, front and back, filling from the bottom to the top. Imagine expanding in all directions.  (It may take a while to let go of old patterns of breathing.)   This is our natural way to breath and is worth practicing if you find you tend to breath upward rather than deep. This natural breath triggers a relaxation response in your nervous system.  Also, tension in your belly can cause tension in your back too. Learning to let go of tension in your belly is one part of minimizing back pain.

Now for the relaxing part.  Exhale slowly and completely.  Let your exhale be twice as long as your inhale.

Before moving on, pause and remember that your breath is an automatic process.  Your body knows when to inhale and when to exhale.  Notice this for a few breaths. Like you are watching the waves in the ocean.  You don’t have to make the waves happen, simply watch them.   Let the air move in all three directions on the inhale and then when your body is ready to exhale, slow it down and let it be complete before the next breath comes in.  It may help to adjust and stand or sit in alignment comfortably, because that position allows the lungs to expand in all directions.

Close your eyes and ride the full waves of your breath.  Notice what happens to any tension in your body.   If it starts to feel more tense rather than relaxing, go back to watching your breath.  This takes practice, so give it time.surf-1945572__480

What does this have to do with exercise?

  • Knowing how to use your breath to relax allows you to turn moments of waiting in line or at a stop light into opportunities to relax and recharge your energy
  • With the energy you save from your body not “overworking” in those moments, you might notice you have more energy to move in more moments of your day
  • Breath awareness helps guide you during exercise to find the just right level for your body.

Keep Moving, BREATHE Well,

Janet

PS:  For more information on how this works in your body, check out this Mechanics of Breathing Video  (6:53min in length) by movement scientist Katy Bowman.

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician

Leave a comment

by | June 28, 2017 · 3:26 pm

Can the pressure to lose weight keep you from losing it?

Enjoy this guest post by one of our amazing clinical dietitians Narmin Virani, RD, LDN

Today, I want to tell you a story.  I have had some very interesting conversations with a few post-op patients that I simply had to share.  I met 3-4 post-op patients over the last 2 months or so, all of whom were about 6-24 months post bariatric surgery, starting to regain some weight, struggling with getting back on track.  Very similar situations.  These were all bright and sensible women, who had each encountered some stress in their lives.  One had to pick up extra hours at work due to a coworker of hers getting fired, one had some medical issues that had got worse, one was caring for an elderly parent, while one had had an accident that caused her to take leave from work.  Due to these additional demands on their time and energy, or due to not being physically able, all had got off track with exercise.  This led to some weight regain for all of them.  This weight regain led to feeling depressed and discouraged, which led to low motivation with planning and preparing meals.  This led to eating out, not caring about meal planning, which led to guilt.  This guilt made the feelings of depression/discouragement worse, which led to “comfort eating”, which caused some more weight gain.

What struck me about each of these women was that they all were feeling terrible about their weight gain, said they almost didn’t attend their follow-ups because of that, were beating up on themselves for having got off track, and were wondering if they could go on a crash diet to lose the weight they had gained.  These women had all encountered some very real stressors that life can sometimes throw at us.  But instead of being kind and compassionate to themselves during these difficult times, they beat up on themselves for gaining weight, which ironically discouraged them further.  It made me realize: the pressure to lose weight can keep you from losing weight!  How ironical!

Now, as someone who has been doing weight-loss counseling for 15 years, and as someone who had my share of weight cycling/crash dieting as a teenager/young adult, here are my 2 cents of wisdom I’ve gleaned over the years:

  1. The scale can be a double-edged sword.  Yes, having a weight goal can sometimes be motivating, but at other times can lead to discouragement and feelings of failure.
  2. There will come times in your lives, when you will have to put weight loss on hold.  Times when you are overwhelmed with extra demands on your time and energy or times when you are sick.  At such times, chasing weight loss will only add to your stress, and stress can deplete your motivation.
  3. At such times, focusing on self-care – eating foods that nourish and satisfy you, moving in ways that de-stress and energize you – will actually motivate you and help you lose weight. Thinking that losing the weight you have regained first will motivate you to plan meals and move more is actually a “backwards” way of going about it.
  4. At such times, accepting and respecting your body can lead to nourishing and caring for it, while being critical can lead to body-punishing exercise/diets that are hard to sustain.
  5. At such times, going on a crash diet might leave you hungry, tired, deprived, and miserable for a few weeks, and make you lose a lot of water weight, which would come back on as soon as you added regular foods back in.  And you may already know this, but dieting leads to deprivation, deprivation leads to cravings, cravings lead to out-of-control eating.
  6. Satisfaction and Convenience are 2 key ingredients for long term success.  You could be on the world’s healthiest diet, but if you are not satisfied, you could end up thinking about and looking for food all the time, because you’re missing something.  Similarly, if it takes a lot of time and effort to put together meals daily, it will be hard to keep up during busy periods in your life.
  7. Satisfaction means eating foods that are not only filling, but that also leave you feeling energized, and that please your palate.  It’s striking a balance between taste and health, allowing yourself regular indulgences without guilt.  Convenience means keeping frozen meals on hand as back-up for busy days, and knowing that it’s perfectly okay to get take-out meals at times, which may include some healthy choices and some not-so-healthy ones that you are craving, without guilt
  8. These times in your lives are BUMPS IN THE ROAD, NOT THE END OF THE ROAD.  And the more you focus on self-care vs. weight at these times, the sooner you will lose the weight you have gained.  And it’s okay to tell well-meaning family members who instill the fear of relapse in you, that they are not helping.
  9. Maybe you won’t lose 80-100 lbs, but say 30-50 lbs.  But what’s the point of losing 80-100 lbs if you’re unsatisfied all the time?  Isn’t it better to lose a little and keep it off, than to lose a lot and gain it back? And aren’t health and quality of life more important than weight?
  10. As far as comfort-eating goes – for a person for whom food is the only way they have learnt to soothe their soul, turning to food at stressful times is actually a very smart survival mechanism – without it, they may either jump off a bridge or take to other, more dangerous ways of self-numbing.  The problem is not turning to food for comfort – everyone does it at times – the problem is when food is the only source of comfort.  The solution?  Cultivating other ways to cope and soothe – from building strong support systems, to making time for rest and recreation without guilt, to putting your needs above those of others.

Of course, all this is easier said than done, when you have spent half your life dieting, chasing weight goals, beating up on yourself for your weight, eating by numbers – calories/carbs/etc, and forgotten what true hunger/fullness/satisfaction feel like.  It’s natural to keep reverting back to what’s familiar and comfortable, even though we know it doesn’t always serve us.  It’s easier to be critical rather than accepting of our bodies in a thinness-obsessed society.  It’s harder to give yourself credit for the weight you have lost and kept off, and easier to beat up on yourself for the weight you’ve gained.  This is why support groups are helpful.  For sharing your struggles, which might not be yours alone.  For coming up with ideas for coping with stress.  For coming up with ways to practice self-kindness and compassion.  For cheering others on who may be struggling.  For sharing your stories of what helped you get through the tough times in your life.

Don’t ever give up!  Take each day at a time!  Eat in ways that satisfy you!  Move in ways that give you more energy, help you sleep better, reduce stress/anxiety!  Come to your follow-up appointments, we are here to help, not judge you! And oh, take that number on the scale with a grain of salt!

“For both excessive and insufficient exercise destroy one’s strength, and both eating too much or too little destroy health, whereas the right quantity produces, increases and preserves it” – Aristotle

Narmin Virani, RD, LDN

Clinical Dieititan, Weight Center
UMass Memorial Medical Center

 

 

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by | June 13, 2017 · 8:15 pm
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